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Heirloom Tomato Gazpacho

Heirloom Tomato Gazpacho


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Fresh gazpacho made with heirloom tomatoes and Muir Glen™ tomatoes.MORE+LESS-

Updated November 25, 2014

1

(15 ounce) can Muir Glen™ diced tomatoes

2

large heirloom tomatoes, diced

1/2

small red onion, diced

1

small red pepper, diced

1/2

large cucumber, peeled, seeded and diced

2

tablespoons fresh chives, minced

Hide Images

  • 1

    Add canned tomatoes to a food processor or blender and pulse until smooth, but still slightly chunky.

  • 2

    Wash and dice finely celery, peppers, onions, and cucumbers. For cucumber, peel the cucumber and scrape the seeds out with a spoon before dicing.

  • 3

    Add veggies to the processed tomatoes.

  • 4

    Mince garlic and chives and add to the mix.

  • 5

    Add olive oil, red wine vinegar, and sugar to mix.

  • 6

    Wash heirloom tomatoes well and cut out the stem part. Then dice. Add the tomatoes and any juice to the gazpacho.

  • 7

    Taste the gazpacho and season well with salt and pepper. Adjust flavors for vinegar and oil as well.

  • 8

    You can serve this immediately, but it's best if it chills in the fridge for an hour before serving.

No nutrition information available for this recipe

More About This Recipe

  • It’s really tough to find something in the food world that’s better than a ripe August tomato, in my opinion.

    As a kid, my dad used to grow tons of tomatoes (not literally). I would spend afternoons just going through the vines, picking the ripest ones and eating them on the spot.

    These days, heirloom tomatoes are all the rage – and with good reason. They have a great texture and flavor that’s much deeper than your standard beefsteak tomato. In my opinion, they are worth the few extra bucks.

    And remember the golden rule about heirloom tomatoes. Typically, the ugliest ones are the tastiest!

    This heirloom tomato gazpacho uses a few fresh tomatoes along with tons of fresh veggies to make a light, cold soup that’s perfect for the hot days of summer.

    Of course, the most important part of any good gazpacho is the tomatoes.

    In my gazpacho, I like to use some canned tomatoes for the soupy base and fresh tomatoes as a major add-in. Just one can of tomatoes is more than enough.

    One of my favorite canned tomatoes these days is the organic Muir Glen. They have a really fresh flavor and work great in dishes like this.

    To prep them for the gazpacho, just add them to a food processor or blender and pulse them a few times. You don’t want to blend them completely, but you want to break them down a bit. Some chunks are good.

    Now it’s time to get chopping! This recipe only takes a few minutes to make if you’re a solid chopper. If you’re not a good chopper, then this recipe will make you one!

    Spend time on the celery, onion, pepper, and cucumber to make sure you get nice even pieces.

    Once they are all chopped, you can add them in with your processed tomatoes.

    There are a few other flavors that I like to add to gazpacho. These are stronger flavors, so go light on them. Especially be careful not to over-do the garlic. More than a clove would be too much.

    Mince those and add them to the gazpacho mix along with the olive oil, red wine vinegar, sugar, and lime juice. In my opinion, the vinegar is maybe the most important ingredient besides the tomatoes. It isn’t optional.

    Now it’s time to tackle those heirlooms.

    Even though one of my tomatoes is green, it’s actually ripe. That’s just the color of it when ripe. Heirloom tomatoes come in all colors, shapes, and sizes, which makes them really fun.

    Dice up the tomatoes and add them to the mix! Be sure to scrape in any tomato juice as well.

    Then just stir everything together with a spoon and taste it!

    You’ll probably need to add a good pinch of salt and pepper. Also, feel free to add more vinegar or olive oil to suit your tastes. Make it yours!

    You can definitely serve this right away, but it’s even better if you let it chill for an hour or two before serving.

    Not only is this recipe really healthy, but you also don’t have to cook anything, which is a huge win in my book on a hot summer day.

    If you’re trying to beat the heat, give this a shot!

    Nick averages at least a tomato a day for the month of August. Check out his blog, Macheesmo, and his Tablespoon Profile!


Heirloom Tomato Gazpacho with Grilled Bread

Very excited to bring you this heirloom tomato gazpacho! The most vibrant, refreshing summer soup that’s creamy, tangy, and full of bright flavor. It’s the easiest recipe that highlights summer produce at its best. I like to serve it with grilled bread for dipping. Perfect way to start any meal or even makes for a wonderful lunch.

Heirloom tomato gazpacho – the details

A summer never goes by without a big batch of gazpacho being made in my kitchen! I’d say it’s sort of a quintessential summer recipe…truly the best way to enjoy tomatoes while they’re at their peak.

I’ve kept this recipe pretty classic, with flavors of garlic, shallot, and vinegar at the forefront and garden cucumbers & peppers rounding out the base of the soup. Everything gets combined with juicy tomatoes and sits at room temperature for about 30 minutes before blending. The key to a really creamy gazpacho is using a high-powered blender and blending for at least 90 seconds.

After the soup is blended, you’ll want to chill it so it’s nice and cold for serving.

What makes this gazpacho really special, though? The cherry tomato topping and side of grilled bread. The topping is a simple mix of sweet heirloom cherry tomatoes, scallions, chives, another splash of vinegar, and lots of black pepper. It adds this second layer of tomato goodness with every spoonful of gazpacho.

And the grilled bread? Very necessary in my book. Gazpacho can be fairly strong since it’s all raw vegetables and slightly acidic from the vinegar. I love balancing it out with smoky bread for dipping.

I also love adding LOTS of fresh garden basil. I’ve been adding basil to everything these days because it’s been growing like crazy in our little herb garden. It adds such fresh flavor and what could be better than the combo of tomatoes + basil?

Summertime in a bowl! Serve this alongside a big summer salad for lunch or maybe follow it up with these seared scallops for dinner.


What is gazpacho?

Gazpacho is chilled vegetable soup common in Spain. Tomato is normally the vegetable of choice, but over time other vegetables have been used as the base. I first fell in love with Gazpacho while coaching basketball in Madrid one summer. I've visited other parts of Spain many times since and have enjoyed the regional differences in flavors and approach to this chilled soup.

The two things that are consistent across regions are one - they use only the ripest tomatoes and two - they are served extremely chilled. For my latest version, I went for an heirloom tomato gazpacho to take advantage of the delectable locally-sourced tomatoes I get at my neighborhood farmer's market. Heirloom tomatoes don't make this gazpacho recipe any less easy, it just adds a more complex flavor profile.

Summertime offers access to all varieties of ripe tomatoes as well as a variety of options for ingredients. At our neighborhood farmer's market I was able to cop a few different heirloom tomatoes, purple sweet peppers, and amaranth.


Ingredients for Classic Heirloom Tomato Gazpacho Without Bread

This version of gazpacho is made without bread crumbs so it’s suitable for a gluten-free, low-carb diet. The sweetness of heirloom tomatoes creates a lovely balance with the tangy vinegar and intensity of fresh herbs. It doesn’t need the addition of bread crumbs as a thickening agent.

The key to a successful gazpacho is fresh tomatoes – ideally heirloom tomatoes – paired with fresh vegetables, herbs and quality olive oil.

Store-bought vegetables don’t really cut it for a gazpacho! For the best results, shop for produce at a farmer’s market or use veggies grown in your own garden. It’s very easy to grow your own tomatoes and not only do they taste better but you’ll save money too!

When shopping for produce, look for the freshest sweet peppers, cucumbers and ripe tomatoes you can find. Don’t worry about the appearance of the vegetables as they’re going to be blended into the soup.

Another important ingredient in classic gazpacho is quality extra-virgin olive oil. Spanish olive oil has a grassy, slightly peppery flavour that makes it ideally suited to gazpacho.

For this recipe I used the slightly sweet Limited Production Variedad Hojiblanca produced by Segura & Mancha in Seville but you can use any fine quality olive oil.


Heirloom tomato gazpacho recipe

Three Blue Ducks' heirloom tomato gazpacho soup recipe. Photo: Edwina Pickles Difficulty Easy Dietary Dairy-free

This gazpacho is easy to throw together and takes about 10 minutes to prepare – just stick everything in the blender. With the salad and halloumi, it's a great lunch, or serve it with grilled chicken or fish for dinner.


Heirloom Tomato Gazpacho with Grilled Bread

Very excited to bring you this heirloom tomato gazpacho! The most vibrant, refreshing summer soup that’s creamy, tangy, and full of bright flavor. It’s the easiest recipe that highlights summer produce at its best. I like to serve it with grilled bread for dipping. Perfect way to start any meal or even makes for a wonderful lunch.

Heirloom tomato gazpacho – the details

A summer never goes by without a big batch of gazpacho being made in my kitchen! I’d say it’s sort of a quintessential summer recipe…truly the best way to enjoy tomatoes while they’re at their peak.

I’ve kept this recipe pretty classic, with flavors of garlic, shallot, and vinegar at the forefront and garden cucumbers & peppers rounding out the base of the soup. Everything gets combined with juicy tomatoes and sits at room temperature for about 30 minutes before blending. The key to a really creamy gazpacho is using a high-powered blender and blending for at least 90 seconds.

After the soup is blended, you’ll want to chill it so it’s nice and cold for serving.

What makes this gazpacho really special, though? The cherry tomato topping and side of grilled bread. The topping is a simple mix of sweet heirloom cherry tomatoes, scallions, chives, another splash of vinegar, and lots of black pepper. It adds this second layer of tomato goodness with every spoonful of gazpacho.

And the grilled bread? Very necessary in my book. Gazpacho can be fairly strong since it’s all raw vegetables and slightly acidic from the vinegar. I love balancing it out with smoky bread for dipping.

I also love adding LOTS of fresh garden basil. I’ve been adding basil to everything these days because it’s been growing like crazy in our little herb garden. It adds such fresh flavor and what could be better than the combo of tomatoes + basil?

Summertime in a bowl! Serve this alongside a big summer salad for lunch or maybe follow it up with these seared scallops for dinner.


Heirloom tomato gazpacho:

  • 3 1/2 pounds (roughly 5 large or 3 very large and 2 medium sized) ripe heirloom tomatoes, cored and chopped into large chunks- I usually just weigh 3 1/2 pounds of heirloom tomatoes, as they all vary in size. If you’re getting these from your garden take a look at my ingredient photo below and you can see the sizes I used. I used 3 very large ones and 2 medium ones.
  • 1 large garlic clove, minced
  • 1 medium jalapeño, (or 1 1/4 jalapeños) sliced and de-seeded – I actually used 1 1/4 jalapeños and a few seeds, as I wanted the soup a bit spicier, but you can add this to taste.
  • 3 tablespoons red wine vinegar, divided
  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt, divided
  • 1/4 cup minced red onion (roughly 1/2 of a small red onion) – reserve the rest of the onion for garnish
  • 1/4 cup chopped cilantro leaves
  • 1/4 cup finely sliced basil leaves (about 10 leaves)
  • 1 teaspoon balsamic vinegar – or more to taste

Some garnish ideas:

  • diced cucumber – mandatory in my eyes, as it adds a chunky texture to the soup
  • diced red onion – another mandatory garnish in my house!
  • extra-virgin olive oil
  • balsamic vinegar
  • diced avocado
  • cilantro leaves
  • diced red or yellow pepper

Below are all the fresh ingredients needed to make this soup!

Wash, core and chop up the tomatoes. You don’t need to de-seed these tomatoes, just chop them up and use it all!

Not sure how to core a tomato? Check out the step-by-step photos below. Wash and chop the cilantro, and finely slice the basil leaves. Mince the garlic clove and red onion.

Get out a large blender (I used my Vitamix) and place about a third of the chopped tomatoes into the blender add the minced garlic, sliced jalapeño, 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar, 1 tablespoon olive oil and 1/4 teaspoon sea salt.
Blend on the highest speed until completely smooth.

NOTE: The soup color will vary depending on what color tomatoes you use. When I use a mixture of yellow and red heirlooms, the soup comes out more orange in color. When I use a batch of red heirlooms, my soup comes out a deeper red-orange. If you’re going for a deeper red-orange color, then use more red heirlooms.

Pour the first batch into a large bowl and repeat the process with the remaining tomatoes, red wine vinegar and olive oil. You may just need to do one more batch if you have a large blender, or 2 more batches if your blender is smaller.

Add the rest of the pureed soup to the bowl.

Stir in the remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt to the pureed soup. Taste the soup, and if you want more heat, return 1 cup of the pureed soup to the blender and add in some more jalapeño. Once blended, pour the soup back into the bowl and give it a stir.

Stir in 1 teaspoon balsamic vinegar, minced red onion, chopped cilantro, and sliced basil. Season the soup to taste. You may want to add in a bit more balsamic or salt. I chose to keep the big batch of soup the way it was, and let my guests/kids add more salt, balsamic or olive oil per individual taste.

Pour the soup into a sealed container and refrigerate for 1 to 2 hours, or until cool. This soup tastes best day one, but will keep if kept in the refrigerator for a couple of days.

I love serving this soup up on the deck family style! I place out bowls of fresh homemade croutons, diced red onion, sliced basil, diced cucumber, diced red or yellow pepper and cilantro leaves. I also put out bottles of olive oil and balsamic for people to top their soup with. It’s like a big family style picnic where everyone gets to create their own little bowl of summer heaven.

My favorite way to enjoy this soup is with some diced red onion, diced cucumber, diced red pepper, homemade croutons! YUM! The cucumber and red pepper add that extra crunchy texture, and the croutons just absorb the soup, making it extra yummy!

If you want more spice for your individual bowl of soup, try adding some green tabasco sauce. My friend Steve swears by this stuff, and is always topping his gazpacho with it! He’s a gazpacho fan and gave this soup the double thumbs up! Yippee!If you love heirloom tomatoes, then you have to try my heirloom tomato soup! This soup is the bomb! It’s completely vegan, but tastes like there is cream in it. Go figure! It’s kid approved, loved and devoured!Check back later this week, when I’ll show you how to make these homemade croutons! They’re so easy to make, and really make a difference in any salad or soup!


Easy Gazpacho Recipe

  • Author: Chef Whitney Aronoff
  • Prep Time: 5 minutes
  • Cook Time: 0 minutes
  • Total Time: 5 minutes
  • Yield: 4 servings 1 x
  • Category: Soup
  • Method: Blender
  • Cuisine: Spanish
  • Diet: Vegan

Description

Healthy, clean ingredient and easy gazpacho recipe using heirloom tomatoes for a smooth flavor.

Ingredients

  • 2 ½ lbs. yellow heirloom tomatoes
  • 2 cloves of garlic
  • ½ English cucumber, peeled and de-seeded
  • ½ medium yellow bell pepper
  • ½ small red onion
  • ¼ cup red wine vinegar
  • 1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tsp sea salt
  • ¼ tsp white pepper
  • ½ inch of a small red chili such as a Fresno chili (optional)

Instructions

  1. Wash and chop vegetables. Add all ingredients to a high-speed blender and blend well till smooth. Test for additional sea salt or seasoning as desired.
  2. Enjoy thick or for a smoother finish strain through a sieve. Press the soup with a spatula in order to extract as much of the liquid as possible. Refrigerate in an airtight container for a least 2 hours prior to serving. Soup holds well for 7 days.

Notes

Can’t find yellow heirloom tomatoes? Red and orange tomatoes are a perfect substitute. Enjoy the flavor you get from different types of tomatoes.

I like chilling my soup in 32-oz jars. It makes for easy pouring when ready to serve.

Run through a sieve after blending for an extra smooth soup. For a bit more thick consistency enjoy as is.

Keywords: heirloom tomato gazpacho, chilled soup, tomato soup recipe, summer soup recipe, yellow tomato recipe, yellow gazpacho recipe, gluten free gazpacho, bread free gazpacho

Did you make this recipe?

Tag @WhitneyAronoff on Instagram and hashtag it #starseedkitchen

Thank you for reading. Follow me on Instagram, Facebook, and Pinterest for more Starseed Kitchen inspiration.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Hi, I’m Whitney Aronoff, a Holistic Chef based in Laguna Beach, California. I graduated from Southern Methodist University with a degree in Communications, and went on to the health supportive culinary school, The Natural Gourmet Institute, in New York City. I work as a personal chef and teach cooking classes, with a focus on healthy, whole foods cooking.

My goal is to help people feel their best by sharing the delicious, healthy recipes I prepare weekly for my clients. I want you to have the energy to live your best life and fulfil your dreams.

As we become more conscious and make more quality food choices, our body, mind, soul and the planet benefits.


The Difference Between Heirloom Tomatoes and Store-bought Tomatoes

Technically tomatoes are a fruit and this Heirloom Tomato Gazpacho recipe counts on the best fresh tomatoes you can find. This means field tomatoes rather than those grown in a greenhouse or one of the genetically engineered varieties made for uniformity, appearance and durability rather than flavour.

One of the first things you’ll notice about heirloom tomatoes is that they come in different sizes, shapes and colours. There will be often be variations among the fruit even on the same plant!

While this can be challenging if you’re trying to make a structured dish where a uniform size is important, in a gazpacho recipe it’s all about the flavour. Heirloom tomatoes have a depth and complexity to their sweetness you just can’t find in hybrid tomatoes so size and shape don’t matter!

Heirloom tomatoes also have thinner skins and softer flesh which makes them less durable for commercial transportation but much better for no-cook recipes such as gazpacho.

Here are some of the best varieties of heirloom tomatoes to look for when making gazpacho:

  • Alicante
  • Amish Paste
  • Bonny Best
  • Brandywine
  • Purple Russian
  • Cherokee Chocolate
  • Stupice
  • German Johnson

Can I make non-heirloom tomato gazpacho?

The advantage of heirloom tomatoes is they tend to have more varied flavors and colors. Additionally, regular commercial tomatoes have over time been so manufactured aka systematically bred for perfect round shapes and red color at the expense of flavor. This isn't to say that you can't make good gazpacho with regular tomatoes.

Your technique and execution have to be on point though or you'll end up with a can of V8. More often than not, I use a combination of plain tomatoes (plum and cherry). I'm primarily looking for ripe, plump, and sweet type of tomatoes. Beefsteak covers all bases. I'd also add that use of quality ingredients is paramount whether we're talking about cucumbers, peppers, herbs, or vinegars.


Creamy Heirloom Tomato Gazpacho

In San Francisco, we suffer through a cold and foggy July and August in anticipation of the warm, sunny Indian summer days that arrive during September and October. While our East Coast counterparts are thinking about pulling out winter coats and boots, in the Bay Area we’re just breaking in our shorts and flip-flops to soak up these late-arriving rays. The heirloom tomatoes are perfectly ripe and the sun is out, so what better time to make cool, creamy gazpacho?

I think gazpacho is a smashing summer idea, but it always has cucumbers in it. At the risk of offending cucumber-lovers out there, let me just say that cucumbers are so gross. I’ll grudgingly admit that they add some creaminess and tang to the soup, so I adapted a Melissa Clark recipe for gazpacho that eschews the cucumbers in favor of sheep’s milk yogurt–which is both creamy and tangy, and more importantly, totally not gross.

I made a big batch to bring over to some friends who are about to have their first baby. With this in their freezer, they can pull it out to thaw in the fridge and enjoy it some sunny day in the near future. I saved some for myself and poured it into 5 oz glasses so I could serve it as a tiny soup course before a dinner party. No spoons needed – just a shot of late-summer tomato sweetness down the gullet.



Comments:

  1. Drue

    This version is deprecated

  2. Jacen

    Strangely like this

  3. Elvey

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  4. Dia

    In my opinion, you are wrong. I'm sure. Let's discuss this. Email me at PM.



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