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5 Culinary Content Network Stories to Read Right Now (Slideshow)

5 Culinary Content Network Stories to Read Right Now (Slideshow)


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Keeping you up to date in the world of great food and folk

Dinners, Dishes & Desserts — Whole Wheat Coconut Banana Bread

Dinners, Dishes & Desserts is a blog by a family-oriented Colorado mom with a desire to share her recipes and try new things. In this post, she helps us use up bananas in a recipe for whole wheat coconut banana bread.

Baking a Moment — Homemade Crumb Donuts

Baking a Moment is a blog by Allie, who loves to bake and heads straight for the kitchen whenever she has a free moment. Here, she bakes doughnuts made with a sweet cinnamon glaze and a buttery crumb topping.

Mom, What’s for Dinner? — Healthy Deviled Eggs

Mom, What’s for Dinner? is a blog by a mom whose daughter has celiac disease. She shares tips and tricks and gluten-free recipes for cooking for someone with celiac disease. In this post, she uses Greek yogurt mixed with vinegar, salt, and pepper as a mayonnaise substitute to make a healthy deviled eggs recipe.

Healthy Tomato’s Blog — Vegetarian Beet Chili

Healthy Tomato’s Blog is meant to uncover the healing powers and benefits of tomato and to serve as a “creative outlet” for blog owner Rini in expressing her love for technology, cooking, and the tomato. Here, she shares a recipe for vegetarian beet chili.

I Can Cook That — Spice-Roasted Salmon

I Can Cook That, a blog by Kaitlin intended for those who “think they can’t cook, that cooking takes too long or that recipes can’t be used if the exact ingredients aren’t available,” aims to help them “realize that cooking, and cooking well, aren’t that tough to do.” Here, she gives us a recipe for roasted salmon sprinkled with garam masala that packs a ton of flavor.


Cutting Up with Chef Duane Nutter

Du ane Nutter may be the only chef in culinary history to appear on both Food Network’s Iron Chef and Comedy Central’s Laugh Riots (he was a semifinalist). But, then again, the man known in stand-up comedy circles as the Mad Chef is full of surprises, including pioneering the idea of haute cuisine in an airport as the chef of Atlanta’s One Flew South. These days you’ll find Nutter behind the pass at Southern National, the acclaimed restaurant in Mobile he cofounded in 2017. Here he riffs on a few tasty subjects.

“In culinary school, when my instructor explained how to make coq au vin, a classic French dish, I was at the edge of my seat, soaking in every word: I’m going to learn how to cook that fancy stuff that’s hard to pronounce! Later that night, I’m looking at my notes, studying the ingredients and technique. A rooster, bacon, ham, red wine, stock, butter…wait a second. You’re telling me this is gourmet? Strip out the fancy French name, and you’ve got what we call in the South smothered chicken! No wonder it’s considered peasant food in France.”

Hold the Tentacles

“At dinner with a friend, I ordered paella. He gives me a look that says, You chefs will eat anything. Wait, what? We ate jambalaya two nights ago—this is the same thing, with some saffron, and cooked in a different pan. ‘So what don’t you like about the paella?’ I asked. He said it was the way the calamari tentacles were waving at him, and the name didn’t sound good. So let me get this straight: You’re all right with your beloved fried bologna coming from ground-up meat from a pig’s head, but a calamari tentacle is too much? Oookay.”

Greens with Envy

“Kale has gone from a garnish on fruit trays to the hip center of the plate—I thought you could get no higher praise as a leafy green. But, nooooo! You remember two years ago when Neiman Marcus decided to sell sixty-six-dollar collard greens in their Christmas catalogue? Kale was in first class looking back at all the other leafy greens in coach. And then out of nowhere, collard greens go and get on a private jet. I can hear my grandmother now: ‘Those greens better clean themselves, cook themselves, and put the dishes away
before I spend that kind of money.’”


Cutting Up with Chef Duane Nutter

Du ane Nutter may be the only chef in culinary history to appear on both Food Network’s Iron Chef and Comedy Central’s Laugh Riots (he was a semifinalist). But, then again, the man known in stand-up comedy circles as the Mad Chef is full of surprises, including pioneering the idea of haute cuisine in an airport as the chef of Atlanta’s One Flew South. These days you’ll find Nutter behind the pass at Southern National, the acclaimed restaurant in Mobile he cofounded in 2017. Here he riffs on a few tasty subjects.

“In culinary school, when my instructor explained how to make coq au vin, a classic French dish, I was at the edge of my seat, soaking in every word: I’m going to learn how to cook that fancy stuff that’s hard to pronounce! Later that night, I’m looking at my notes, studying the ingredients and technique. A rooster, bacon, ham, red wine, stock, butter…wait a second. You’re telling me this is gourmet? Strip out the fancy French name, and you’ve got what we call in the South smothered chicken! No wonder it’s considered peasant food in France.”

Hold the Tentacles

“At dinner with a friend, I ordered paella. He gives me a look that says, You chefs will eat anything. Wait, what? We ate jambalaya two nights ago—this is the same thing, with some saffron, and cooked in a different pan. ‘So what don’t you like about the paella?’ I asked. He said it was the way the calamari tentacles were waving at him, and the name didn’t sound good. So let me get this straight: You’re all right with your beloved fried bologna coming from ground-up meat from a pig’s head, but a calamari tentacle is too much? Oookay.”

Greens with Envy

“Kale has gone from a garnish on fruit trays to the hip center of the plate—I thought you could get no higher praise as a leafy green. But, nooooo! You remember two years ago when Neiman Marcus decided to sell sixty-six-dollar collard greens in their Christmas catalogue? Kale was in first class looking back at all the other leafy greens in coach. And then out of nowhere, collard greens go and get on a private jet. I can hear my grandmother now: ‘Those greens better clean themselves, cook themselves, and put the dishes away
before I spend that kind of money.’”


Cutting Up with Chef Duane Nutter

Du ane Nutter may be the only chef in culinary history to appear on both Food Network’s Iron Chef and Comedy Central’s Laugh Riots (he was a semifinalist). But, then again, the man known in stand-up comedy circles as the Mad Chef is full of surprises, including pioneering the idea of haute cuisine in an airport as the chef of Atlanta’s One Flew South. These days you’ll find Nutter behind the pass at Southern National, the acclaimed restaurant in Mobile he cofounded in 2017. Here he riffs on a few tasty subjects.

“In culinary school, when my instructor explained how to make coq au vin, a classic French dish, I was at the edge of my seat, soaking in every word: I’m going to learn how to cook that fancy stuff that’s hard to pronounce! Later that night, I’m looking at my notes, studying the ingredients and technique. A rooster, bacon, ham, red wine, stock, butter…wait a second. You’re telling me this is gourmet? Strip out the fancy French name, and you’ve got what we call in the South smothered chicken! No wonder it’s considered peasant food in France.”

Hold the Tentacles

“At dinner with a friend, I ordered paella. He gives me a look that says, You chefs will eat anything. Wait, what? We ate jambalaya two nights ago—this is the same thing, with some saffron, and cooked in a different pan. ‘So what don’t you like about the paella?’ I asked. He said it was the way the calamari tentacles were waving at him, and the name didn’t sound good. So let me get this straight: You’re all right with your beloved fried bologna coming from ground-up meat from a pig’s head, but a calamari tentacle is too much? Oookay.”

Greens with Envy

“Kale has gone from a garnish on fruit trays to the hip center of the plate—I thought you could get no higher praise as a leafy green. But, nooooo! You remember two years ago when Neiman Marcus decided to sell sixty-six-dollar collard greens in their Christmas catalogue? Kale was in first class looking back at all the other leafy greens in coach. And then out of nowhere, collard greens go and get on a private jet. I can hear my grandmother now: ‘Those greens better clean themselves, cook themselves, and put the dishes away
before I spend that kind of money.’”


Cutting Up with Chef Duane Nutter

Du ane Nutter may be the only chef in culinary history to appear on both Food Network’s Iron Chef and Comedy Central’s Laugh Riots (he was a semifinalist). But, then again, the man known in stand-up comedy circles as the Mad Chef is full of surprises, including pioneering the idea of haute cuisine in an airport as the chef of Atlanta’s One Flew South. These days you’ll find Nutter behind the pass at Southern National, the acclaimed restaurant in Mobile he cofounded in 2017. Here he riffs on a few tasty subjects.

“In culinary school, when my instructor explained how to make coq au vin, a classic French dish, I was at the edge of my seat, soaking in every word: I’m going to learn how to cook that fancy stuff that’s hard to pronounce! Later that night, I’m looking at my notes, studying the ingredients and technique. A rooster, bacon, ham, red wine, stock, butter…wait a second. You’re telling me this is gourmet? Strip out the fancy French name, and you’ve got what we call in the South smothered chicken! No wonder it’s considered peasant food in France.”

Hold the Tentacles

“At dinner with a friend, I ordered paella. He gives me a look that says, You chefs will eat anything. Wait, what? We ate jambalaya two nights ago—this is the same thing, with some saffron, and cooked in a different pan. ‘So what don’t you like about the paella?’ I asked. He said it was the way the calamari tentacles were waving at him, and the name didn’t sound good. So let me get this straight: You’re all right with your beloved fried bologna coming from ground-up meat from a pig’s head, but a calamari tentacle is too much? Oookay.”

Greens with Envy

“Kale has gone from a garnish on fruit trays to the hip center of the plate—I thought you could get no higher praise as a leafy green. But, nooooo! You remember two years ago when Neiman Marcus decided to sell sixty-six-dollar collard greens in their Christmas catalogue? Kale was in first class looking back at all the other leafy greens in coach. And then out of nowhere, collard greens go and get on a private jet. I can hear my grandmother now: ‘Those greens better clean themselves, cook themselves, and put the dishes away
before I spend that kind of money.’”


Cutting Up with Chef Duane Nutter

Du ane Nutter may be the only chef in culinary history to appear on both Food Network’s Iron Chef and Comedy Central’s Laugh Riots (he was a semifinalist). But, then again, the man known in stand-up comedy circles as the Mad Chef is full of surprises, including pioneering the idea of haute cuisine in an airport as the chef of Atlanta’s One Flew South. These days you’ll find Nutter behind the pass at Southern National, the acclaimed restaurant in Mobile he cofounded in 2017. Here he riffs on a few tasty subjects.

“In culinary school, when my instructor explained how to make coq au vin, a classic French dish, I was at the edge of my seat, soaking in every word: I’m going to learn how to cook that fancy stuff that’s hard to pronounce! Later that night, I’m looking at my notes, studying the ingredients and technique. A rooster, bacon, ham, red wine, stock, butter…wait a second. You’re telling me this is gourmet? Strip out the fancy French name, and you’ve got what we call in the South smothered chicken! No wonder it’s considered peasant food in France.”

Hold the Tentacles

“At dinner with a friend, I ordered paella. He gives me a look that says, You chefs will eat anything. Wait, what? We ate jambalaya two nights ago—this is the same thing, with some saffron, and cooked in a different pan. ‘So what don’t you like about the paella?’ I asked. He said it was the way the calamari tentacles were waving at him, and the name didn’t sound good. So let me get this straight: You’re all right with your beloved fried bologna coming from ground-up meat from a pig’s head, but a calamari tentacle is too much? Oookay.”

Greens with Envy

“Kale has gone from a garnish on fruit trays to the hip center of the plate—I thought you could get no higher praise as a leafy green. But, nooooo! You remember two years ago when Neiman Marcus decided to sell sixty-six-dollar collard greens in their Christmas catalogue? Kale was in first class looking back at all the other leafy greens in coach. And then out of nowhere, collard greens go and get on a private jet. I can hear my grandmother now: ‘Those greens better clean themselves, cook themselves, and put the dishes away
before I spend that kind of money.’”


Cutting Up with Chef Duane Nutter

Du ane Nutter may be the only chef in culinary history to appear on both Food Network’s Iron Chef and Comedy Central’s Laugh Riots (he was a semifinalist). But, then again, the man known in stand-up comedy circles as the Mad Chef is full of surprises, including pioneering the idea of haute cuisine in an airport as the chef of Atlanta’s One Flew South. These days you’ll find Nutter behind the pass at Southern National, the acclaimed restaurant in Mobile he cofounded in 2017. Here he riffs on a few tasty subjects.

“In culinary school, when my instructor explained how to make coq au vin, a classic French dish, I was at the edge of my seat, soaking in every word: I’m going to learn how to cook that fancy stuff that’s hard to pronounce! Later that night, I’m looking at my notes, studying the ingredients and technique. A rooster, bacon, ham, red wine, stock, butter…wait a second. You’re telling me this is gourmet? Strip out the fancy French name, and you’ve got what we call in the South smothered chicken! No wonder it’s considered peasant food in France.”

Hold the Tentacles

“At dinner with a friend, I ordered paella. He gives me a look that says, You chefs will eat anything. Wait, what? We ate jambalaya two nights ago—this is the same thing, with some saffron, and cooked in a different pan. ‘So what don’t you like about the paella?’ I asked. He said it was the way the calamari tentacles were waving at him, and the name didn’t sound good. So let me get this straight: You’re all right with your beloved fried bologna coming from ground-up meat from a pig’s head, but a calamari tentacle is too much? Oookay.”

Greens with Envy

“Kale has gone from a garnish on fruit trays to the hip center of the plate—I thought you could get no higher praise as a leafy green. But, nooooo! You remember two years ago when Neiman Marcus decided to sell sixty-six-dollar collard greens in their Christmas catalogue? Kale was in first class looking back at all the other leafy greens in coach. And then out of nowhere, collard greens go and get on a private jet. I can hear my grandmother now: ‘Those greens better clean themselves, cook themselves, and put the dishes away
before I spend that kind of money.’”


Cutting Up with Chef Duane Nutter

Du ane Nutter may be the only chef in culinary history to appear on both Food Network’s Iron Chef and Comedy Central’s Laugh Riots (he was a semifinalist). But, then again, the man known in stand-up comedy circles as the Mad Chef is full of surprises, including pioneering the idea of haute cuisine in an airport as the chef of Atlanta’s One Flew South. These days you’ll find Nutter behind the pass at Southern National, the acclaimed restaurant in Mobile he cofounded in 2017. Here he riffs on a few tasty subjects.

“In culinary school, when my instructor explained how to make coq au vin, a classic French dish, I was at the edge of my seat, soaking in every word: I’m going to learn how to cook that fancy stuff that’s hard to pronounce! Later that night, I’m looking at my notes, studying the ingredients and technique. A rooster, bacon, ham, red wine, stock, butter…wait a second. You’re telling me this is gourmet? Strip out the fancy French name, and you’ve got what we call in the South smothered chicken! No wonder it’s considered peasant food in France.”

Hold the Tentacles

“At dinner with a friend, I ordered paella. He gives me a look that says, You chefs will eat anything. Wait, what? We ate jambalaya two nights ago—this is the same thing, with some saffron, and cooked in a different pan. ‘So what don’t you like about the paella?’ I asked. He said it was the way the calamari tentacles were waving at him, and the name didn’t sound good. So let me get this straight: You’re all right with your beloved fried bologna coming from ground-up meat from a pig’s head, but a calamari tentacle is too much? Oookay.”

Greens with Envy

“Kale has gone from a garnish on fruit trays to the hip center of the plate—I thought you could get no higher praise as a leafy green. But, nooooo! You remember two years ago when Neiman Marcus decided to sell sixty-six-dollar collard greens in their Christmas catalogue? Kale was in first class looking back at all the other leafy greens in coach. And then out of nowhere, collard greens go and get on a private jet. I can hear my grandmother now: ‘Those greens better clean themselves, cook themselves, and put the dishes away
before I spend that kind of money.’”


Cutting Up with Chef Duane Nutter

Du ane Nutter may be the only chef in culinary history to appear on both Food Network’s Iron Chef and Comedy Central’s Laugh Riots (he was a semifinalist). But, then again, the man known in stand-up comedy circles as the Mad Chef is full of surprises, including pioneering the idea of haute cuisine in an airport as the chef of Atlanta’s One Flew South. These days you’ll find Nutter behind the pass at Southern National, the acclaimed restaurant in Mobile he cofounded in 2017. Here he riffs on a few tasty subjects.

“In culinary school, when my instructor explained how to make coq au vin, a classic French dish, I was at the edge of my seat, soaking in every word: I’m going to learn how to cook that fancy stuff that’s hard to pronounce! Later that night, I’m looking at my notes, studying the ingredients and technique. A rooster, bacon, ham, red wine, stock, butter…wait a second. You’re telling me this is gourmet? Strip out the fancy French name, and you’ve got what we call in the South smothered chicken! No wonder it’s considered peasant food in France.”

Hold the Tentacles

“At dinner with a friend, I ordered paella. He gives me a look that says, You chefs will eat anything. Wait, what? We ate jambalaya two nights ago—this is the same thing, with some saffron, and cooked in a different pan. ‘So what don’t you like about the paella?’ I asked. He said it was the way the calamari tentacles were waving at him, and the name didn’t sound good. So let me get this straight: You’re all right with your beloved fried bologna coming from ground-up meat from a pig’s head, but a calamari tentacle is too much? Oookay.”

Greens with Envy

“Kale has gone from a garnish on fruit trays to the hip center of the plate—I thought you could get no higher praise as a leafy green. But, nooooo! You remember two years ago when Neiman Marcus decided to sell sixty-six-dollar collard greens in their Christmas catalogue? Kale was in first class looking back at all the other leafy greens in coach. And then out of nowhere, collard greens go and get on a private jet. I can hear my grandmother now: ‘Those greens better clean themselves, cook themselves, and put the dishes away
before I spend that kind of money.’”


Cutting Up with Chef Duane Nutter

Du ane Nutter may be the only chef in culinary history to appear on both Food Network’s Iron Chef and Comedy Central’s Laugh Riots (he was a semifinalist). But, then again, the man known in stand-up comedy circles as the Mad Chef is full of surprises, including pioneering the idea of haute cuisine in an airport as the chef of Atlanta’s One Flew South. These days you’ll find Nutter behind the pass at Southern National, the acclaimed restaurant in Mobile he cofounded in 2017. Here he riffs on a few tasty subjects.

“In culinary school, when my instructor explained how to make coq au vin, a classic French dish, I was at the edge of my seat, soaking in every word: I’m going to learn how to cook that fancy stuff that’s hard to pronounce! Later that night, I’m looking at my notes, studying the ingredients and technique. A rooster, bacon, ham, red wine, stock, butter…wait a second. You’re telling me this is gourmet? Strip out the fancy French name, and you’ve got what we call in the South smothered chicken! No wonder it’s considered peasant food in France.”

Hold the Tentacles

“At dinner with a friend, I ordered paella. He gives me a look that says, You chefs will eat anything. Wait, what? We ate jambalaya two nights ago—this is the same thing, with some saffron, and cooked in a different pan. ‘So what don’t you like about the paella?’ I asked. He said it was the way the calamari tentacles were waving at him, and the name didn’t sound good. So let me get this straight: You’re all right with your beloved fried bologna coming from ground-up meat from a pig’s head, but a calamari tentacle is too much? Oookay.”

Greens with Envy

“Kale has gone from a garnish on fruit trays to the hip center of the plate—I thought you could get no higher praise as a leafy green. But, nooooo! You remember two years ago when Neiman Marcus decided to sell sixty-six-dollar collard greens in their Christmas catalogue? Kale was in first class looking back at all the other leafy greens in coach. And then out of nowhere, collard greens go and get on a private jet. I can hear my grandmother now: ‘Those greens better clean themselves, cook themselves, and put the dishes away
before I spend that kind of money.’”


Cutting Up with Chef Duane Nutter

Du ane Nutter may be the only chef in culinary history to appear on both Food Network’s Iron Chef and Comedy Central’s Laugh Riots (he was a semifinalist). But, then again, the man known in stand-up comedy circles as the Mad Chef is full of surprises, including pioneering the idea of haute cuisine in an airport as the chef of Atlanta’s One Flew South. These days you’ll find Nutter behind the pass at Southern National, the acclaimed restaurant in Mobile he cofounded in 2017. Here he riffs on a few tasty subjects.

“In culinary school, when my instructor explained how to make coq au vin, a classic French dish, I was at the edge of my seat, soaking in every word: I’m going to learn how to cook that fancy stuff that’s hard to pronounce! Later that night, I’m looking at my notes, studying the ingredients and technique. A rooster, bacon, ham, red wine, stock, butter…wait a second. You’re telling me this is gourmet? Strip out the fancy French name, and you’ve got what we call in the South smothered chicken! No wonder it’s considered peasant food in France.”

Hold the Tentacles

“At dinner with a friend, I ordered paella. He gives me a look that says, You chefs will eat anything. Wait, what? We ate jambalaya two nights ago—this is the same thing, with some saffron, and cooked in a different pan. ‘So what don’t you like about the paella?’ I asked. He said it was the way the calamari tentacles were waving at him, and the name didn’t sound good. So let me get this straight: You’re all right with your beloved fried bologna coming from ground-up meat from a pig’s head, but a calamari tentacle is too much? Oookay.”

Greens with Envy

“Kale has gone from a garnish on fruit trays to the hip center of the plate—I thought you could get no higher praise as a leafy green. But, nooooo! You remember two years ago when Neiman Marcus decided to sell sixty-six-dollar collard greens in their Christmas catalogue? Kale was in first class looking back at all the other leafy greens in coach. And then out of nowhere, collard greens go and get on a private jet. I can hear my grandmother now: ‘Those greens better clean themselves, cook themselves, and put the dishes away
before I spend that kind of money.’”


Watch the video: Top 5 Sunny Anderson Recipe Videos of All Time. Food Network (July 2022).


Comments:

  1. Gracin

    Thanks to the author for this wonderful post!

  2. Gow

    It is a simply magnificent phrase

  3. Arundel

    You probably made a mistake?

  4. Mokree

    Amazing theme ....



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