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New Potatoes with Dill Butter Recipe

New Potatoes with Dill Butter Recipe


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These new potatoes don't take too long to cook, and do taste great with a compound butter.

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup (1/2 stick) unsalted butter, room temperature
  • 2 tablespoons (packed) coarsely chopped fresh dill plus more for garnish
  • Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper
  • 2 pounds new potatoes or other small potatoes
  • 1 tablespoon crushed toasted caraway seeds (optional)

Recipe Preparation

  • Mash butter and 2 Tbsp. dill in a small bowl. Season dill butter with salt and pepper. DO AHEAD: Can be made 1 week ahead. Cover and chill.

  • Place potatoes in a large pot. Cover with cold water by 1 inch; season with salt. Bring to a boil; reduce heat to medium and simmer gently until tender, 10–12 minutes. Drain.

  • Transfer hot potatoes to a medium bowl; add dill butter and 1 Tbsp. water. Toss, adding water by teaspoonfuls as needed, until butter lightly coats potatoes with a glossy sauce. Season with salt and pepper and transfer to a serving bowl. Garnish with more dill and caraway seeds, if desired.

Recipe by The Bon Appétit Test Kitchen,

Nutritional Content

7 servings, 1 serving contains: Calories (kcal) 140 Fat (g) 7 Saturated Fat (g) 4 Cholesterol (mg) 15 Carbohydrates (g) 17 Dietary Fiber (g) 3 Total Sugars (g) 1 Protein (g) 3 Sodium (mg) 75Reviews Section

Boston Market Garlic Dill New Potatoes

Technically speaking "new potatoes" can be any young potato. Boston Market, however, uses red potatoes for this particular dish, and they're actually not all that young. So, for this recipe you need some common, medium-size red potatoes. After cutting the potatoes into bite-size slices, you steam them on a steamer rack or basket in a large covered saucepan over boiling water. When the potatoes are done, toss them with a delicious mix of melted butter, fresh dill, and garlic, and you've got a quick clone that could stand up to any taste test.

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  • 8 medium red potatoes
  • 3 tablespoons butter, melted
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh dill
  • 2 teaspoons minced garlic (about 2 cloves)
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt

1. Cut the potatoes in half (lengthwise), cut the halves in half (also lengthwise), then cut the quarters in half (yeah, still lengthwise), so that you have eight wedges from each potato. Steam the sliced potatoes on a steamer rack over boiling water in a large, covered saucepan for 10 minutes, or until the tip of a knife encounters just a little resistance when stuck into the potatoes. The potatoes will cook a bit more after they come off the heat, so you want to be sure not to overcook them.

2. Combine the melted butter, dill, garlic, and salt in a small bowl.

3. When the potatoes are cooked, dump them into a medium bowl. Pour the garlic butter over the potatoes, then gently toss the potatoes until they are well coated. Be careful not to toss the potatoes too much or they may start to fall apart, and you're not making mashed potatoes.


Why Cook Instant Pot Baby Potatoes

First of all, potatoes are nutritious (hello Vitamin C and potassium!) and very satiating. Baby potatoes are slightly less starchy than more mature, larger potatoes and thus have a slightly firmer texture when cooked. They work really well in potato salads but can also be served as a side dish with pretty much anything.

Cooking baby potatoes in the Instant Pot is really quick and the pressure cooking steaming technique locks in more nutrients than say boiling the potatoes on the stovetop.


How To Make Delicious New Potatoes With Dill Butter

There is one thing that my Gramps always wanted to see on his plate when he came home from work and that was meat and potatoes. He didn’t care much what kind they were, he just wanted both of those food items. Grandma was super happy to please Gramps, and she knew what he liked. She was the best at making the same thing, but making it taste different each time. One of the favorites of his were little potatoes flavored with dill. He liked his plain mashed, baked, or fried, but these were a special treat.

I found a recipe just like the one my Grandma used to use on epicurious not that long ago, and it brought back so many memories of eating with them. I kind of forget about the little devils until the picture came across my screen. I couldn’t wait to make them for my husband, to see if he liked them that much too.

They went over really well at my table. At first he was a little confused of the flavoring, because I hardly ever season my potatoes with anything too heavy. Salt and pepper, maybe some seasoning salt or garlic powder. These really had a completely different taste… and we likey!


How To Make Delicious New Potatoes With Dill Butter

Whenever we are having a cookout or friends over for dinner, this is the perfect side dish to help and spread out the main entree. I am always worried that we aren’t going to have enough food to go around, but these potatoes are a definite filler upper. They are really tasty too, so people usually take a pretty decent helping size. Not to mention, they are really affordable so that helps with the total cost of the shindig. Check out what they are saying about this recipe over at epicurious:

“The main thing I liked about this dish was that it was simple. It was tasty as well…”

1/4 cup (1/2 stick) Land O’ Lakes unsalted butter, room temperature

2 tablespoons (packed) coarsely chopped fresh dill plus more for garnish

Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper

2 pounds new potatoes or other small potatoes

1 tablespoon crushed toasted caraway seeds (optional)

Mash butter and 2 tablespoons dill in a small bowl. Season dill butter with salt and pepper. DO AHEAD: Can be made 1 week ahead. Cover and chill.

Place potatoes in a large pot. Cover with cold water by 1″ season with salt. Bring to a boil reduce heat to medium and simmer gently until tender, 10-12 minutes. Drain.

Transfer hot potatoes to a medium bowl add dill butter and 1 tablespoon water. Toss, adding water by teaspoonfuls as needed, until butter lightly coats potatoes with a glossy sauce. Season with salt and pepper and transfer to a serving bowl. Garnish with more dill and caraway seeds, if desired.

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Quick Tip: Try mixing in unmelted fat free yogurt and use less butter.
Thanks again to epicurious for this tasty recipe.


Buttered Dill Potatoes

This easy potato recipe is the recipe of my childhood. My mom would make these buttered dill potatoes at least once a week.

Steamed potatoes tossed lightly with butter, dill, salt, and pepper – it really doesn’t get any easier or tastier than that.

While you can certainly boil the potatoes, I like to steam them to lock in as many nutrients as possible. If you’re looking for a cheap steamer insert, I’ve used this one for years.

Creamy Little Company Potato baby potatoes are halved, steamed then tossed lightly in butter, fresh dill, salt and pepper. It’s as easy and as delicious as it sounds.

Serve with roasted chicken, meatloaf, baked salmon, pot roast – you name it! These potatoes are versatile, comforting and always a family favorite.


New Potatoes With Garlic Dill Butter Recipe

Recipe found on a website a few years back and is a favourite in our house! These potatoes are very flavourful and quick to prepare! Lovin' It!

  • delicious
  • and
  • easy
  • potatoe
  • butterygarlicky
  • dill
  • steam
  • delicious
  • and
  • easy
  • potatoe
  • butterygarlicky
  • dill
  • steam

Schedule your weekly meals and get auto-generated shopping lists.

  • 8 medium red potatoes, cubed
  • 3 tablespoons butter, melted
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh dill
  • 2 teaspoons minced garlic
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt

Ingredients

  • 8 medium red potatoes, cubed shopping list
  • 3 tablespoons butter, melted shopping list
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh dillshopping list
  • 2 teaspoons minced garlicshopping list
  • 1/4 teaspoon saltshopping list

How to make it

  • Place the potatoes in a steamer basket, and set in a pan over an inch of boiling water. (a vegetable steamer/rice cooker is easier)
  • Cover, and steam for about 10 minutes, until potatoes are tender but not mushy
  • In a small bowl, stir together the melted butter, dill, garlic, and salt
  • Transfer the potatoes to a serving bowl, and pour the seasoned butter over them
  • Toss gently until they are well-coated
  • Serve
  • Goes well with any meat
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I will make this Saturday to go with Sunday dinner it sounds great love dill any way thanks for the great post got my 5 to.


New potatoes with dill

When I was a boy my Dad grew lots of potatoes. Good potatoes. Every year we looked forward to the first crop of new potatoes. My mother always cooked them in exactly the same way: with salt and fresh garden mint. There was no other way. For a special occasion they would be tossed in butter and parsley, but they had to be cooked in salt and garden mint.


Dill krugor (dill pots) lined up in a Swedish supermarket

I remember being shocked to discover, on one of my first trips to Sweden, that Swedes never used mint. I was soon to learn that dill is king in Sweden. Färskpotatis have to be cooked with salt and dill. They must then be tossed in butter and chopped dill. In Sweden too there is no other way.

So which is best? I don’t really know. I prefer the sweet smell of garden fresh mint wafting through the house as the potatoes are cooking. Is that just nostalgia? I don’t know. Tossing them in a little butter and dill is probably better than in butter and parsley, but it is a tough choice. If I am cooking a Swedish meal it has to be with butter and dill, of course.

One thing I am certain of: for the best flavour the potatoes need to be scraped or scrubbed. There was a time when we were being told that it was best to leave the skins on and we should never peel potatoes. Rubbish. Good new potatoes scrape (scrub) so easily and really do taste better without skins.

The problem is that supermarkets don’t like soil. They machine wash new potatoes and shove them in plastic bags. After that they don’t scrape. But by then it doesn’t matter: they just don’t taste like my Dad’s.

The solution is simple: grow your own or buy from a garden shop that doesn’t object to soil. Only then is it worth considering whether dill or mint is best. Try my compromise: mint whilst cooking but tossed in dill. John Duxbury

Summary

Ingredients

900 g (2 lb) freshly picked new potatoes, still with soil on
1 sprig of fresh mint (or dill stalks to be really Swedish)
½ tsp salt
30 g (¼ stick) butter
2 tbsp finely chopped dill
salt (ideally rock salt) and freshly ground black pepper

Method

1. Wash the potatoes and then scrub or scrape off the skins. Rinse the potatoes.

2. Place the larger potatoes over the base of a saucepan and pop the smaller ones on top. Pour in enough boiling water to not quite cover them, add some salt and the sprig of mint.

3. Cover with a tight-fitting lid and simmer gently for between 10 and 20 minutes. The cooking time depends on the variety and size. Test them with a skewer as they must be tender but still firm—overcooking really does spoil them.

4. Drain the potatoes and add the butter, chopped dill and a little pepper to the pan and then return the potatoes to the pan. Put the lid back on the pan and swirl the pan around to get each potato thoroughly coated.

5. Remove the lid, savour the delicious aroma and then sprinkle with a little rock salt before serving dishing them!

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Easy Parsley Butter New Potatoes

Super easy and delicious way to use all the new red potatoes in your garden.

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds Baby Red Potatoes
  • 1 Tablespoon Salt
  • 1 cup Butter
  • ⅓ cups Chopped Parsley

Preparation

Scrub potatoes clean under running water. If they are small, cut them in half if they are large, cube them. Leave the skins on. Place potates in a stock pot and sprinkle with the salt, cover with cold water and boil until fork tender (approximately 15 minutes). Drain in a colander and then return to the hot pot and allow them to release steam for a few minutes. This makes them fluffier.

While potatoes are boiling, melt the butter in the microwave, 15 seconds at a time. When completely melted, stir in the chopped parsley. Pour over the potatoes and toss to evenly coat. Serve immediately.


Indian Fried Dill Potatoes

The best thing about fried potatoes… crispy edges! And what’s better than plain fried potatoes?

Indian Fried DILL Potatoes!

These potatoes are slightly spicy with big dill flavor. Pan-fry them until they’re golden brown, then toss in as much fresh dill as you want (I used a big handful). You can eat these potatoes as a side dish or add in some sausage to make a tasty breakfast hash.

Don’t like white potatoes? Use sweet potatoes instead.

A lot of people assume that Indian food is difficult to make. I promise you… cooking Indian food is NO BIG DILL. Oh, I meant to say deal. It’s no big deal. Alright, I guess I’m not fooling anyone. You know I’ve been dying to say that.

Really though, these fried potatoes are so simple to make. You need cumin seeds, turmeric and Kashmiri chili powder. Kashmiri chili is a mild chili – I like to describe it as being similar to a combination of paprika and cayenne. It’s adds a slightly spicy flavor and when combined with turmeric, it creates a pretty orange color.

This dish is actually called Aloo Suva in Hindi or Aloo Soya in Punjabi – those both literally translate to “Potato Dill.” You can also make this same dish with fresh fenugreek leaves (also known as kasoori methi leaves). You can sometimes find fresh methi leaves at an Indian grocery store. I decided to use dill because I bought a big bunch at the farmer’s market. I’m glad I did too because I just love the fresh and tangy flavor it adds to these potatoes. I think I’m going to try adding dill to my potato pakora recipe next!



Comments:

  1. Yazid

    It just doesn't happen

  2. Petre

    wonderfully, very entertaining piece

  3. Elmo

    yeah, they weren't impressed at all.

  4. Shaktirn

    I confirm. It was with me too. Let's discuss this issue.

  5. Fitzpatrick

    Cheap got stolen, was easily lost.



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