New recipes

What 10 Famous Chefs Are Making Their Moms for Mother's Day Slideshow

What 10 Famous Chefs Are Making Their Moms for Mother's Day Slideshow


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Take menu inspiration from these great culinary minds

What 10 Famous Chefs Are Making Their Moms for Mother's Day

Find out what Adam Richman and nine other chefs are making their moms this Mother's Day and find inspiration for your own menu.

Jimmy Bradley

“Cooking on Mother's Day is an opportunity to use all of the delicious spring ingredients that become available. In Philadelphia years ago, I used to make snapper soup or crab imperial — the classic American dish with crabmeat and cream stuffed into a clean shellfish shell, then breaded and gratinéed — dishes that weren't Italian, as my whole family is amazing at that and I always want to do something a little different. If going more of the Italian route, however, I'll do a really good Timpano a festive pasta dish almost like a pasta torte or pie — which I make with penne, egg, ham, Parmesan and fontina, spinach, and lots of fresh herbs in a springform pan lined with a little pie dough and baked.”

Thomas Chen

“On Mother's Day, I'm cooking for another special mother in my life: my wife and mom of our little daughter. With both our schedules being so different (she works weekdays and I work nights and weekends), brunch is when we get to spend time together as a family. I'm making her a special brunch with some of her favorite things, such as indulgent steak with seared foie gras and eggs, fluffy pancakes, and potato hash.”

Leah Cohen

“This Mother's Day I am cooking sticky toffee pudding for my mom. She has a sweet tooth (probably where I get mine from) and I just came across the best sticky toffee pudding on an app called ChefSteps. I made it for my staff this week and they all flipped out over it, so I knew I needed to make some for my mom.”

Danny Grant

Every year for Mother’s Day, Maple & Ash‘s two Michelin-starred executive chef Danny Grant makes his mom roasted lobster and king crab alongside a handmade pasta, and he uses the juices from the lobster and king crab to make a pasta sauce. He’s been doing it for over 10 years now. He wanted to combine all of his mother’s favorites into a luxurious, thoughtful, delicious meal. The pasta is an added bonus that soaks up all the love from the roasted seafood. He roasts the lobster and king crab on the open fire until the meat caramelizes. He then places the seafood in a cast iron pan and bastes with lemon, chili oil, and herbs. After they enjoy the bountiful treasures of the sea, he dumps homemade noodles in the residual juices. This abundant meal pairs perfectly with white Burgundy, his favorite!

Richard Hales

“For Mother’s Day, I will make my mom Filipino adobo. My mom’s grandmother used to make this for the whole family years ago. When she passed away, no one had the recipe. I then re-created this recipe from memory so my family, including my mom, could enjoy once again.”

Yvette Leeper-Bueno

“This Sunday my mother and I will be working side by side at Vinateria. It may not be the most glamorous, but we’ll be together! We’ll share a dish of Vinateria’s Manchego Polenta, inspired by the cornmeal porridge that we always made while I was growing up. The polenta— food of the poor, 'cucina povera Italiana' — is something hearty and warming, perfect for when we need something substantive for the long day.”

Harold Moore

“I am making fried chicken, macaroni and cheese, plus grilled asparagus and cucumber salad. Mom loves a meat and three just as much as the next guy!”

Justin Neubeck

“Lamb with spring peas and greens, labneh, and chermoula — wood-fired if possible!”

Adam Richman

“The most important thing I'm making with my mom for Mother's Day is a solid block of time to just hang out with her. Between my travel schedule and her personal commitments, we don't always get much more than a meal here, a movie there, or every so often we'll catch a Broadway play or concert. Although we talk and text often, there's nothing like face-to-face time with your loved ones. My mom has been looking great these days and she claims to owe it to a ‘Mediterranean Diet.’ If I’m going to make my mother anything, it's definitely going to be about preparation, maintaining the essence of the food, and not a ton of ingredients. Maybe a nice roasted fish with high-quality olive oil, lemon, really good sea salt, some fresh herbs, and because the farmers markets are really picking up now in New York, probably a salad and a side dish from some amazing local veggies. But don't be fooled! We will still probably end up at a place called The Chocolate Room, in Brooklyn, as it has always been one of our favorites.”

Chris Santos

“I unfortunately haven't spent a Mother's Day with my mom in many years due to my hectic schedule, but if I was it would be something low and slow — because what I learned from her cooking is that patience is truly a virtue in the kitchen!”


What 10 Famous Chefs Are Making Their Moms for Mother's Day Slideshow - Recipes

Mariana never expected to sell food for a living.

The mother of three, including a newborn, found herself caring for her children, her brother, who had suffered a stroke in 2018, and her mother, who was diagnosed with uterine cancer in 2019.

After the pandemic hit in March 2020, her mother decided to end chemotherapy treatments and return to their native state of Puebla, Mexico. Two months later, her mother passed away. Then, her husband, Horacio, was hospitalized with COVID-19.

”It seems like God has mistaken me for someone else,” she said, as if she has been receiving someone else’s punishment. That’s when Mariana decided to sell tamales and mole at home. She makes them with chicken or beef, every other week.

Parishioners from her church and other community members come knocking on her door for tamales. A Norristown restaurant sells her mole.

“I wasn’t expecting this kind of support,” she said. “It seems that I don’t cook that bad, right?”

Mariana said that she learned to cook the tamales and make mole with the abuelitas and older ladies that met during festivals and gatherings in Puebla when she was a child. The 37-year-old said cooking has become a space for her to find joy and to provide for her family.

In the kitchen, she said she loves the blend of colors of the japaleños, chiles, nopales, and tomatoes. She also likes the flavor of mole with arroz con pollo and enchiladas. Mariana sent her brother back to Puebla last week, where he can find open patios and more siblings to care for him. She said she feels useful as she works from home in times when her family needs her most.

“I know that every one of us will live difficult times in their lives,” she said. ”For good or for bad, this is mine and I just pray to God for strength to keep cooking through it.”

These moms brought family and culture together

The toughest years of motherhood for Zaza Briceño, 57, were when her three children had to flee Venezuela because of the humanitarian and economic crisis that has been affecting her home country for more than 20 years.

“I passed from living with my children to have them a video call away, and even sometimes the electrical and internet instability of the country did not even allow me to do that,” she said. “I had to teach them from the phone how to make the recipes I made them like my empanadas, my arepas and my calentadito [a mix of beef and rice], and now, I am teaching how to make them for my grandchildren.”

The country that once gave her endless opportunities could not offer the same to her children, who are among the 5.4 million Venezuelans who have left the country since 2015 according to the United Nations. “I eventually did not see a future for myself in my own country, and I also decided to move closer to my children and to have a better future,” said Briceño who now works in a mortgage company in Delaware and lives with her sister Margarita Swartz, 59.

Swartz moved with her family to Philadelphia in 1988 after she was carjacked in Caracas. Years later, she got divorced and was able to find a job where she could spend time at home and take care of her children. She became one of the best-known real estate agents for the Latino and Venezuelan community in Philadelphia, and that also has helped her share her roots with her children and stepchildren.

They would invite friends to their house to eat tequeños, arepas, pernil, among many other traditional specialties, and play Venezuelan music in their basement — where eventually Casa de Venezuela Philadelphia, a nonprofit that supports Venezuelan immigrants, was founded.

Briceño and Swartz were inspired by their late mother, Lía Medina de Briceño, who they say taught them everything they know. Her memory helps them to maintain their Venezuelan roots in their home away from home.

This single mom is an empowered business owner

After she divorced in the late 1990s, Sagrario Germán, relied on her cooking to provide for her family. Raising her two daughters as a single mother, she worked two restaurant shifts in northern Manhattan, one as a waitress overnight and the other as the evening cook at her mother’s comedor económico.

The native of the coastal town of Nagua, Dominican Republic, became a skilled cook while working with her mother — specializing in seafood dishes prepared with coconut milk or garlic sauce from her home province.

“Even though I never studied it [cooking], I’m extremely proud of what I’ve been able to do in the kitchen,” Germán, 46, said.

In 2008, Germán decided to move to Philadelphia with her family to open a restaurant of her own called Vivaldi in Fairhill. Since then, Germán has been providing customers with the traditional Dominican cuisine: mofongo, pernil, mero empanizado, arroz amarillo con pollo asado y habichuelas, tostones, mangú, and more. Her specialty is shrimp in garlic sauce.

Germán has run all parts of the restaurant, including its management and deliveries. Her daughters have graduated from college and she has been able to provide job opportunities for others in her family.

”It gives me so much peace of mind to think that I’ve been able to build this being the head of my household.”

Despite having to close her business last year due to the pandemic, Germán was able to return and slowly recover her clientele and workers. Now, she says can prepare for retirement.

”After we’ve worked so hard — me, my mother, and my entire family — I think it’s time to do things calmly.”


What 10 Famous Chefs Are Making Their Moms for Mother's Day Slideshow - Recipes

Mariana never expected to sell food for a living.

The mother of three, including a newborn, found herself caring for her children, her brother, who had suffered a stroke in 2018, and her mother, who was diagnosed with uterine cancer in 2019.

After the pandemic hit in March 2020, her mother decided to end chemotherapy treatments and return to their native state of Puebla, Mexico. Two months later, her mother passed away. Then, her husband, Horacio, was hospitalized with COVID-19.

”It seems like God has mistaken me for someone else,” she said, as if she has been receiving someone else’s punishment. That’s when Mariana decided to sell tamales and mole at home. She makes them with chicken or beef, every other week.

Parishioners from her church and other community members come knocking on her door for tamales. A Norristown restaurant sells her mole.

“I wasn’t expecting this kind of support,” she said. “It seems that I don’t cook that bad, right?”

Mariana said that she learned to cook the tamales and make mole with the abuelitas and older ladies that met during festivals and gatherings in Puebla when she was a child. The 37-year-old said cooking has become a space for her to find joy and to provide for her family.

In the kitchen, she said she loves the blend of colors of the japaleños, chiles, nopales, and tomatoes. She also likes the flavor of mole with arroz con pollo and enchiladas. Mariana sent her brother back to Puebla last week, where he can find open patios and more siblings to care for him. She said she feels useful as she works from home in times when her family needs her most.

“I know that every one of us will live difficult times in their lives,” she said. ”For good or for bad, this is mine and I just pray to God for strength to keep cooking through it.”

These moms brought family and culture together

The toughest years of motherhood for Zaza Briceño, 57, were when her three children had to flee Venezuela because of the humanitarian and economic crisis that has been affecting her home country for more than 20 years.

“I passed from living with my children to have them a video call away, and even sometimes the electrical and internet instability of the country did not even allow me to do that,” she said. “I had to teach them from the phone how to make the recipes I made them like my empanadas, my arepas and my calentadito [a mix of beef and rice], and now, I am teaching how to make them for my grandchildren.”

The country that once gave her endless opportunities could not offer the same to her children, who are among the 5.4 million Venezuelans who have left the country since 2015 according to the United Nations. “I eventually did not see a future for myself in my own country, and I also decided to move closer to my children and to have a better future,” said Briceño who now works in a mortgage company in Delaware and lives with her sister Margarita Swartz, 59.

Swartz moved with her family to Philadelphia in 1988 after she was carjacked in Caracas. Years later, she got divorced and was able to find a job where she could spend time at home and take care of her children. She became one of the best-known real estate agents for the Latino and Venezuelan community in Philadelphia, and that also has helped her share her roots with her children and stepchildren.

They would invite friends to their house to eat tequeños, arepas, pernil, among many other traditional specialties, and play Venezuelan music in their basement — where eventually Casa de Venezuela Philadelphia, a nonprofit that supports Venezuelan immigrants, was founded.

Briceño and Swartz were inspired by their late mother, Lía Medina de Briceño, who they say taught them everything they know. Her memory helps them to maintain their Venezuelan roots in their home away from home.

This single mom is an empowered business owner

After she divorced in the late 1990s, Sagrario Germán, relied on her cooking to provide for her family. Raising her two daughters as a single mother, she worked two restaurant shifts in northern Manhattan, one as a waitress overnight and the other as the evening cook at her mother’s comedor económico.

The native of the coastal town of Nagua, Dominican Republic, became a skilled cook while working with her mother — specializing in seafood dishes prepared with coconut milk or garlic sauce from her home province.

“Even though I never studied it [cooking], I’m extremely proud of what I’ve been able to do in the kitchen,” Germán, 46, said.

In 2008, Germán decided to move to Philadelphia with her family to open a restaurant of her own called Vivaldi in Fairhill. Since then, Germán has been providing customers with the traditional Dominican cuisine: mofongo, pernil, mero empanizado, arroz amarillo con pollo asado y habichuelas, tostones, mangú, and more. Her specialty is shrimp in garlic sauce.

Germán has run all parts of the restaurant, including its management and deliveries. Her daughters have graduated from college and she has been able to provide job opportunities for others in her family.

”It gives me so much peace of mind to think that I’ve been able to build this being the head of my household.”

Despite having to close her business last year due to the pandemic, Germán was able to return and slowly recover her clientele and workers. Now, she says can prepare for retirement.

”After we’ve worked so hard — me, my mother, and my entire family — I think it’s time to do things calmly.”


What 10 Famous Chefs Are Making Their Moms for Mother's Day Slideshow - Recipes

Mariana never expected to sell food for a living.

The mother of three, including a newborn, found herself caring for her children, her brother, who had suffered a stroke in 2018, and her mother, who was diagnosed with uterine cancer in 2019.

After the pandemic hit in March 2020, her mother decided to end chemotherapy treatments and return to their native state of Puebla, Mexico. Two months later, her mother passed away. Then, her husband, Horacio, was hospitalized with COVID-19.

”It seems like God has mistaken me for someone else,” she said, as if she has been receiving someone else’s punishment. That’s when Mariana decided to sell tamales and mole at home. She makes them with chicken or beef, every other week.

Parishioners from her church and other community members come knocking on her door for tamales. A Norristown restaurant sells her mole.

“I wasn’t expecting this kind of support,” she said. “It seems that I don’t cook that bad, right?”

Mariana said that she learned to cook the tamales and make mole with the abuelitas and older ladies that met during festivals and gatherings in Puebla when she was a child. The 37-year-old said cooking has become a space for her to find joy and to provide for her family.

In the kitchen, she said she loves the blend of colors of the japaleños, chiles, nopales, and tomatoes. She also likes the flavor of mole with arroz con pollo and enchiladas. Mariana sent her brother back to Puebla last week, where he can find open patios and more siblings to care for him. She said she feels useful as she works from home in times when her family needs her most.

“I know that every one of us will live difficult times in their lives,” she said. ”For good or for bad, this is mine and I just pray to God for strength to keep cooking through it.”

These moms brought family and culture together

The toughest years of motherhood for Zaza Briceño, 57, were when her three children had to flee Venezuela because of the humanitarian and economic crisis that has been affecting her home country for more than 20 years.

“I passed from living with my children to have them a video call away, and even sometimes the electrical and internet instability of the country did not even allow me to do that,” she said. “I had to teach them from the phone how to make the recipes I made them like my empanadas, my arepas and my calentadito [a mix of beef and rice], and now, I am teaching how to make them for my grandchildren.”

The country that once gave her endless opportunities could not offer the same to her children, who are among the 5.4 million Venezuelans who have left the country since 2015 according to the United Nations. “I eventually did not see a future for myself in my own country, and I also decided to move closer to my children and to have a better future,” said Briceño who now works in a mortgage company in Delaware and lives with her sister Margarita Swartz, 59.

Swartz moved with her family to Philadelphia in 1988 after she was carjacked in Caracas. Years later, she got divorced and was able to find a job where she could spend time at home and take care of her children. She became one of the best-known real estate agents for the Latino and Venezuelan community in Philadelphia, and that also has helped her share her roots with her children and stepchildren.

They would invite friends to their house to eat tequeños, arepas, pernil, among many other traditional specialties, and play Venezuelan music in their basement — where eventually Casa de Venezuela Philadelphia, a nonprofit that supports Venezuelan immigrants, was founded.

Briceño and Swartz were inspired by their late mother, Lía Medina de Briceño, who they say taught them everything they know. Her memory helps them to maintain their Venezuelan roots in their home away from home.

This single mom is an empowered business owner

After she divorced in the late 1990s, Sagrario Germán, relied on her cooking to provide for her family. Raising her two daughters as a single mother, she worked two restaurant shifts in northern Manhattan, one as a waitress overnight and the other as the evening cook at her mother’s comedor económico.

The native of the coastal town of Nagua, Dominican Republic, became a skilled cook while working with her mother — specializing in seafood dishes prepared with coconut milk or garlic sauce from her home province.

“Even though I never studied it [cooking], I’m extremely proud of what I’ve been able to do in the kitchen,” Germán, 46, said.

In 2008, Germán decided to move to Philadelphia with her family to open a restaurant of her own called Vivaldi in Fairhill. Since then, Germán has been providing customers with the traditional Dominican cuisine: mofongo, pernil, mero empanizado, arroz amarillo con pollo asado y habichuelas, tostones, mangú, and more. Her specialty is shrimp in garlic sauce.

Germán has run all parts of the restaurant, including its management and deliveries. Her daughters have graduated from college and she has been able to provide job opportunities for others in her family.

”It gives me so much peace of mind to think that I’ve been able to build this being the head of my household.”

Despite having to close her business last year due to the pandemic, Germán was able to return and slowly recover her clientele and workers. Now, she says can prepare for retirement.

”After we’ve worked so hard — me, my mother, and my entire family — I think it’s time to do things calmly.”


What 10 Famous Chefs Are Making Their Moms for Mother's Day Slideshow - Recipes

Mariana never expected to sell food for a living.

The mother of three, including a newborn, found herself caring for her children, her brother, who had suffered a stroke in 2018, and her mother, who was diagnosed with uterine cancer in 2019.

After the pandemic hit in March 2020, her mother decided to end chemotherapy treatments and return to their native state of Puebla, Mexico. Two months later, her mother passed away. Then, her husband, Horacio, was hospitalized with COVID-19.

”It seems like God has mistaken me for someone else,” she said, as if she has been receiving someone else’s punishment. That’s when Mariana decided to sell tamales and mole at home. She makes them with chicken or beef, every other week.

Parishioners from her church and other community members come knocking on her door for tamales. A Norristown restaurant sells her mole.

“I wasn’t expecting this kind of support,” she said. “It seems that I don’t cook that bad, right?”

Mariana said that she learned to cook the tamales and make mole with the abuelitas and older ladies that met during festivals and gatherings in Puebla when she was a child. The 37-year-old said cooking has become a space for her to find joy and to provide for her family.

In the kitchen, she said she loves the blend of colors of the japaleños, chiles, nopales, and tomatoes. She also likes the flavor of mole with arroz con pollo and enchiladas. Mariana sent her brother back to Puebla last week, where he can find open patios and more siblings to care for him. She said she feels useful as she works from home in times when her family needs her most.

“I know that every one of us will live difficult times in their lives,” she said. ”For good or for bad, this is mine and I just pray to God for strength to keep cooking through it.”

These moms brought family and culture together

The toughest years of motherhood for Zaza Briceño, 57, were when her three children had to flee Venezuela because of the humanitarian and economic crisis that has been affecting her home country for more than 20 years.

“I passed from living with my children to have them a video call away, and even sometimes the electrical and internet instability of the country did not even allow me to do that,” she said. “I had to teach them from the phone how to make the recipes I made them like my empanadas, my arepas and my calentadito [a mix of beef and rice], and now, I am teaching how to make them for my grandchildren.”

The country that once gave her endless opportunities could not offer the same to her children, who are among the 5.4 million Venezuelans who have left the country since 2015 according to the United Nations. “I eventually did not see a future for myself in my own country, and I also decided to move closer to my children and to have a better future,” said Briceño who now works in a mortgage company in Delaware and lives with her sister Margarita Swartz, 59.

Swartz moved with her family to Philadelphia in 1988 after she was carjacked in Caracas. Years later, she got divorced and was able to find a job where she could spend time at home and take care of her children. She became one of the best-known real estate agents for the Latino and Venezuelan community in Philadelphia, and that also has helped her share her roots with her children and stepchildren.

They would invite friends to their house to eat tequeños, arepas, pernil, among many other traditional specialties, and play Venezuelan music in their basement — where eventually Casa de Venezuela Philadelphia, a nonprofit that supports Venezuelan immigrants, was founded.

Briceño and Swartz were inspired by their late mother, Lía Medina de Briceño, who they say taught them everything they know. Her memory helps them to maintain their Venezuelan roots in their home away from home.

This single mom is an empowered business owner

After she divorced in the late 1990s, Sagrario Germán, relied on her cooking to provide for her family. Raising her two daughters as a single mother, she worked two restaurant shifts in northern Manhattan, one as a waitress overnight and the other as the evening cook at her mother’s comedor económico.

The native of the coastal town of Nagua, Dominican Republic, became a skilled cook while working with her mother — specializing in seafood dishes prepared with coconut milk or garlic sauce from her home province.

“Even though I never studied it [cooking], I’m extremely proud of what I’ve been able to do in the kitchen,” Germán, 46, said.

In 2008, Germán decided to move to Philadelphia with her family to open a restaurant of her own called Vivaldi in Fairhill. Since then, Germán has been providing customers with the traditional Dominican cuisine: mofongo, pernil, mero empanizado, arroz amarillo con pollo asado y habichuelas, tostones, mangú, and more. Her specialty is shrimp in garlic sauce.

Germán has run all parts of the restaurant, including its management and deliveries. Her daughters have graduated from college and she has been able to provide job opportunities for others in her family.

”It gives me so much peace of mind to think that I’ve been able to build this being the head of my household.”

Despite having to close her business last year due to the pandemic, Germán was able to return and slowly recover her clientele and workers. Now, she says can prepare for retirement.

”After we’ve worked so hard — me, my mother, and my entire family — I think it’s time to do things calmly.”


What 10 Famous Chefs Are Making Their Moms for Mother's Day Slideshow - Recipes

Mariana never expected to sell food for a living.

The mother of three, including a newborn, found herself caring for her children, her brother, who had suffered a stroke in 2018, and her mother, who was diagnosed with uterine cancer in 2019.

After the pandemic hit in March 2020, her mother decided to end chemotherapy treatments and return to their native state of Puebla, Mexico. Two months later, her mother passed away. Then, her husband, Horacio, was hospitalized with COVID-19.

”It seems like God has mistaken me for someone else,” she said, as if she has been receiving someone else’s punishment. That’s when Mariana decided to sell tamales and mole at home. She makes them with chicken or beef, every other week.

Parishioners from her church and other community members come knocking on her door for tamales. A Norristown restaurant sells her mole.

“I wasn’t expecting this kind of support,” she said. “It seems that I don’t cook that bad, right?”

Mariana said that she learned to cook the tamales and make mole with the abuelitas and older ladies that met during festivals and gatherings in Puebla when she was a child. The 37-year-old said cooking has become a space for her to find joy and to provide for her family.

In the kitchen, she said she loves the blend of colors of the japaleños, chiles, nopales, and tomatoes. She also likes the flavor of mole with arroz con pollo and enchiladas. Mariana sent her brother back to Puebla last week, where he can find open patios and more siblings to care for him. She said she feels useful as she works from home in times when her family needs her most.

“I know that every one of us will live difficult times in their lives,” she said. ”For good or for bad, this is mine and I just pray to God for strength to keep cooking through it.”

These moms brought family and culture together

The toughest years of motherhood for Zaza Briceño, 57, were when her three children had to flee Venezuela because of the humanitarian and economic crisis that has been affecting her home country for more than 20 years.

“I passed from living with my children to have them a video call away, and even sometimes the electrical and internet instability of the country did not even allow me to do that,” she said. “I had to teach them from the phone how to make the recipes I made them like my empanadas, my arepas and my calentadito [a mix of beef and rice], and now, I am teaching how to make them for my grandchildren.”

The country that once gave her endless opportunities could not offer the same to her children, who are among the 5.4 million Venezuelans who have left the country since 2015 according to the United Nations. “I eventually did not see a future for myself in my own country, and I also decided to move closer to my children and to have a better future,” said Briceño who now works in a mortgage company in Delaware and lives with her sister Margarita Swartz, 59.

Swartz moved with her family to Philadelphia in 1988 after she was carjacked in Caracas. Years later, she got divorced and was able to find a job where she could spend time at home and take care of her children. She became one of the best-known real estate agents for the Latino and Venezuelan community in Philadelphia, and that also has helped her share her roots with her children and stepchildren.

They would invite friends to their house to eat tequeños, arepas, pernil, among many other traditional specialties, and play Venezuelan music in their basement — where eventually Casa de Venezuela Philadelphia, a nonprofit that supports Venezuelan immigrants, was founded.

Briceño and Swartz were inspired by their late mother, Lía Medina de Briceño, who they say taught them everything they know. Her memory helps them to maintain their Venezuelan roots in their home away from home.

This single mom is an empowered business owner

After she divorced in the late 1990s, Sagrario Germán, relied on her cooking to provide for her family. Raising her two daughters as a single mother, she worked two restaurant shifts in northern Manhattan, one as a waitress overnight and the other as the evening cook at her mother’s comedor económico.

The native of the coastal town of Nagua, Dominican Republic, became a skilled cook while working with her mother — specializing in seafood dishes prepared with coconut milk or garlic sauce from her home province.

“Even though I never studied it [cooking], I’m extremely proud of what I’ve been able to do in the kitchen,” Germán, 46, said.

In 2008, Germán decided to move to Philadelphia with her family to open a restaurant of her own called Vivaldi in Fairhill. Since then, Germán has been providing customers with the traditional Dominican cuisine: mofongo, pernil, mero empanizado, arroz amarillo con pollo asado y habichuelas, tostones, mangú, and more. Her specialty is shrimp in garlic sauce.

Germán has run all parts of the restaurant, including its management and deliveries. Her daughters have graduated from college and she has been able to provide job opportunities for others in her family.

”It gives me so much peace of mind to think that I’ve been able to build this being the head of my household.”

Despite having to close her business last year due to the pandemic, Germán was able to return and slowly recover her clientele and workers. Now, she says can prepare for retirement.

”After we’ve worked so hard — me, my mother, and my entire family — I think it’s time to do things calmly.”


What 10 Famous Chefs Are Making Their Moms for Mother's Day Slideshow - Recipes

Mariana never expected to sell food for a living.

The mother of three, including a newborn, found herself caring for her children, her brother, who had suffered a stroke in 2018, and her mother, who was diagnosed with uterine cancer in 2019.

After the pandemic hit in March 2020, her mother decided to end chemotherapy treatments and return to their native state of Puebla, Mexico. Two months later, her mother passed away. Then, her husband, Horacio, was hospitalized with COVID-19.

”It seems like God has mistaken me for someone else,” she said, as if she has been receiving someone else’s punishment. That’s when Mariana decided to sell tamales and mole at home. She makes them with chicken or beef, every other week.

Parishioners from her church and other community members come knocking on her door for tamales. A Norristown restaurant sells her mole.

“I wasn’t expecting this kind of support,” she said. “It seems that I don’t cook that bad, right?”

Mariana said that she learned to cook the tamales and make mole with the abuelitas and older ladies that met during festivals and gatherings in Puebla when she was a child. The 37-year-old said cooking has become a space for her to find joy and to provide for her family.

In the kitchen, she said she loves the blend of colors of the japaleños, chiles, nopales, and tomatoes. She also likes the flavor of mole with arroz con pollo and enchiladas. Mariana sent her brother back to Puebla last week, where he can find open patios and more siblings to care for him. She said she feels useful as she works from home in times when her family needs her most.

“I know that every one of us will live difficult times in their lives,” she said. ”For good or for bad, this is mine and I just pray to God for strength to keep cooking through it.”

These moms brought family and culture together

The toughest years of motherhood for Zaza Briceño, 57, were when her three children had to flee Venezuela because of the humanitarian and economic crisis that has been affecting her home country for more than 20 years.

“I passed from living with my children to have them a video call away, and even sometimes the electrical and internet instability of the country did not even allow me to do that,” she said. “I had to teach them from the phone how to make the recipes I made them like my empanadas, my arepas and my calentadito [a mix of beef and rice], and now, I am teaching how to make them for my grandchildren.”

The country that once gave her endless opportunities could not offer the same to her children, who are among the 5.4 million Venezuelans who have left the country since 2015 according to the United Nations. “I eventually did not see a future for myself in my own country, and I also decided to move closer to my children and to have a better future,” said Briceño who now works in a mortgage company in Delaware and lives with her sister Margarita Swartz, 59.

Swartz moved with her family to Philadelphia in 1988 after she was carjacked in Caracas. Years later, she got divorced and was able to find a job where she could spend time at home and take care of her children. She became one of the best-known real estate agents for the Latino and Venezuelan community in Philadelphia, and that also has helped her share her roots with her children and stepchildren.

They would invite friends to their house to eat tequeños, arepas, pernil, among many other traditional specialties, and play Venezuelan music in their basement — where eventually Casa de Venezuela Philadelphia, a nonprofit that supports Venezuelan immigrants, was founded.

Briceño and Swartz were inspired by their late mother, Lía Medina de Briceño, who they say taught them everything they know. Her memory helps them to maintain their Venezuelan roots in their home away from home.

This single mom is an empowered business owner

After she divorced in the late 1990s, Sagrario Germán, relied on her cooking to provide for her family. Raising her two daughters as a single mother, she worked two restaurant shifts in northern Manhattan, one as a waitress overnight and the other as the evening cook at her mother’s comedor económico.

The native of the coastal town of Nagua, Dominican Republic, became a skilled cook while working with her mother — specializing in seafood dishes prepared with coconut milk or garlic sauce from her home province.

“Even though I never studied it [cooking], I’m extremely proud of what I’ve been able to do in the kitchen,” Germán, 46, said.

In 2008, Germán decided to move to Philadelphia with her family to open a restaurant of her own called Vivaldi in Fairhill. Since then, Germán has been providing customers with the traditional Dominican cuisine: mofongo, pernil, mero empanizado, arroz amarillo con pollo asado y habichuelas, tostones, mangú, and more. Her specialty is shrimp in garlic sauce.

Germán has run all parts of the restaurant, including its management and deliveries. Her daughters have graduated from college and she has been able to provide job opportunities for others in her family.

”It gives me so much peace of mind to think that I’ve been able to build this being the head of my household.”

Despite having to close her business last year due to the pandemic, Germán was able to return and slowly recover her clientele and workers. Now, she says can prepare for retirement.

”After we’ve worked so hard — me, my mother, and my entire family — I think it’s time to do things calmly.”


What 10 Famous Chefs Are Making Their Moms for Mother's Day Slideshow - Recipes

Mariana never expected to sell food for a living.

The mother of three, including a newborn, found herself caring for her children, her brother, who had suffered a stroke in 2018, and her mother, who was diagnosed with uterine cancer in 2019.

After the pandemic hit in March 2020, her mother decided to end chemotherapy treatments and return to their native state of Puebla, Mexico. Two months later, her mother passed away. Then, her husband, Horacio, was hospitalized with COVID-19.

”It seems like God has mistaken me for someone else,” she said, as if she has been receiving someone else’s punishment. That’s when Mariana decided to sell tamales and mole at home. She makes them with chicken or beef, every other week.

Parishioners from her church and other community members come knocking on her door for tamales. A Norristown restaurant sells her mole.

“I wasn’t expecting this kind of support,” she said. “It seems that I don’t cook that bad, right?”

Mariana said that she learned to cook the tamales and make mole with the abuelitas and older ladies that met during festivals and gatherings in Puebla when she was a child. The 37-year-old said cooking has become a space for her to find joy and to provide for her family.

In the kitchen, she said she loves the blend of colors of the japaleños, chiles, nopales, and tomatoes. She also likes the flavor of mole with arroz con pollo and enchiladas. Mariana sent her brother back to Puebla last week, where he can find open patios and more siblings to care for him. She said she feels useful as she works from home in times when her family needs her most.

“I know that every one of us will live difficult times in their lives,” she said. ”For good or for bad, this is mine and I just pray to God for strength to keep cooking through it.”

These moms brought family and culture together

The toughest years of motherhood for Zaza Briceño, 57, were when her three children had to flee Venezuela because of the humanitarian and economic crisis that has been affecting her home country for more than 20 years.

“I passed from living with my children to have them a video call away, and even sometimes the electrical and internet instability of the country did not even allow me to do that,” she said. “I had to teach them from the phone how to make the recipes I made them like my empanadas, my arepas and my calentadito [a mix of beef and rice], and now, I am teaching how to make them for my grandchildren.”

The country that once gave her endless opportunities could not offer the same to her children, who are among the 5.4 million Venezuelans who have left the country since 2015 according to the United Nations. “I eventually did not see a future for myself in my own country, and I also decided to move closer to my children and to have a better future,” said Briceño who now works in a mortgage company in Delaware and lives with her sister Margarita Swartz, 59.

Swartz moved with her family to Philadelphia in 1988 after she was carjacked in Caracas. Years later, she got divorced and was able to find a job where she could spend time at home and take care of her children. She became one of the best-known real estate agents for the Latino and Venezuelan community in Philadelphia, and that also has helped her share her roots with her children and stepchildren.

They would invite friends to their house to eat tequeños, arepas, pernil, among many other traditional specialties, and play Venezuelan music in their basement — where eventually Casa de Venezuela Philadelphia, a nonprofit that supports Venezuelan immigrants, was founded.

Briceño and Swartz were inspired by their late mother, Lía Medina de Briceño, who they say taught them everything they know. Her memory helps them to maintain their Venezuelan roots in their home away from home.

This single mom is an empowered business owner

After she divorced in the late 1990s, Sagrario Germán, relied on her cooking to provide for her family. Raising her two daughters as a single mother, she worked two restaurant shifts in northern Manhattan, one as a waitress overnight and the other as the evening cook at her mother’s comedor económico.

The native of the coastal town of Nagua, Dominican Republic, became a skilled cook while working with her mother — specializing in seafood dishes prepared with coconut milk or garlic sauce from her home province.

“Even though I never studied it [cooking], I’m extremely proud of what I’ve been able to do in the kitchen,” Germán, 46, said.

In 2008, Germán decided to move to Philadelphia with her family to open a restaurant of her own called Vivaldi in Fairhill. Since then, Germán has been providing customers with the traditional Dominican cuisine: mofongo, pernil, mero empanizado, arroz amarillo con pollo asado y habichuelas, tostones, mangú, and more. Her specialty is shrimp in garlic sauce.

Germán has run all parts of the restaurant, including its management and deliveries. Her daughters have graduated from college and she has been able to provide job opportunities for others in her family.

”It gives me so much peace of mind to think that I’ve been able to build this being the head of my household.”

Despite having to close her business last year due to the pandemic, Germán was able to return and slowly recover her clientele and workers. Now, she says can prepare for retirement.

”After we’ve worked so hard — me, my mother, and my entire family — I think it’s time to do things calmly.”


What 10 Famous Chefs Are Making Their Moms for Mother's Day Slideshow - Recipes

Mariana never expected to sell food for a living.

The mother of three, including a newborn, found herself caring for her children, her brother, who had suffered a stroke in 2018, and her mother, who was diagnosed with uterine cancer in 2019.

After the pandemic hit in March 2020, her mother decided to end chemotherapy treatments and return to their native state of Puebla, Mexico. Two months later, her mother passed away. Then, her husband, Horacio, was hospitalized with COVID-19.

”It seems like God has mistaken me for someone else,” she said, as if she has been receiving someone else’s punishment. That’s when Mariana decided to sell tamales and mole at home. She makes them with chicken or beef, every other week.

Parishioners from her church and other community members come knocking on her door for tamales. A Norristown restaurant sells her mole.

“I wasn’t expecting this kind of support,” she said. “It seems that I don’t cook that bad, right?”

Mariana said that she learned to cook the tamales and make mole with the abuelitas and older ladies that met during festivals and gatherings in Puebla when she was a child. The 37-year-old said cooking has become a space for her to find joy and to provide for her family.

In the kitchen, she said she loves the blend of colors of the japaleños, chiles, nopales, and tomatoes. She also likes the flavor of mole with arroz con pollo and enchiladas. Mariana sent her brother back to Puebla last week, where he can find open patios and more siblings to care for him. She said she feels useful as she works from home in times when her family needs her most.

“I know that every one of us will live difficult times in their lives,” she said. ”For good or for bad, this is mine and I just pray to God for strength to keep cooking through it.”

These moms brought family and culture together

The toughest years of motherhood for Zaza Briceño, 57, were when her three children had to flee Venezuela because of the humanitarian and economic crisis that has been affecting her home country for more than 20 years.

“I passed from living with my children to have them a video call away, and even sometimes the electrical and internet instability of the country did not even allow me to do that,” she said. “I had to teach them from the phone how to make the recipes I made them like my empanadas, my arepas and my calentadito [a mix of beef and rice], and now, I am teaching how to make them for my grandchildren.”

The country that once gave her endless opportunities could not offer the same to her children, who are among the 5.4 million Venezuelans who have left the country since 2015 according to the United Nations. “I eventually did not see a future for myself in my own country, and I also decided to move closer to my children and to have a better future,” said Briceño who now works in a mortgage company in Delaware and lives with her sister Margarita Swartz, 59.

Swartz moved with her family to Philadelphia in 1988 after she was carjacked in Caracas. Years later, she got divorced and was able to find a job where she could spend time at home and take care of her children. She became one of the best-known real estate agents for the Latino and Venezuelan community in Philadelphia, and that also has helped her share her roots with her children and stepchildren.

They would invite friends to their house to eat tequeños, arepas, pernil, among many other traditional specialties, and play Venezuelan music in their basement — where eventually Casa de Venezuela Philadelphia, a nonprofit that supports Venezuelan immigrants, was founded.

Briceño and Swartz were inspired by their late mother, Lía Medina de Briceño, who they say taught them everything they know. Her memory helps them to maintain their Venezuelan roots in their home away from home.

This single mom is an empowered business owner

After she divorced in the late 1990s, Sagrario Germán, relied on her cooking to provide for her family. Raising her two daughters as a single mother, she worked two restaurant shifts in northern Manhattan, one as a waitress overnight and the other as the evening cook at her mother’s comedor económico.

The native of the coastal town of Nagua, Dominican Republic, became a skilled cook while working with her mother — specializing in seafood dishes prepared with coconut milk or garlic sauce from her home province.

“Even though I never studied it [cooking], I’m extremely proud of what I’ve been able to do in the kitchen,” Germán, 46, said.

In 2008, Germán decided to move to Philadelphia with her family to open a restaurant of her own called Vivaldi in Fairhill. Since then, Germán has been providing customers with the traditional Dominican cuisine: mofongo, pernil, mero empanizado, arroz amarillo con pollo asado y habichuelas, tostones, mangú, and more. Her specialty is shrimp in garlic sauce.

Germán has run all parts of the restaurant, including its management and deliveries. Her daughters have graduated from college and she has been able to provide job opportunities for others in her family.

”It gives me so much peace of mind to think that I’ve been able to build this being the head of my household.”

Despite having to close her business last year due to the pandemic, Germán was able to return and slowly recover her clientele and workers. Now, she says can prepare for retirement.

”After we’ve worked so hard — me, my mother, and my entire family — I think it’s time to do things calmly.”


What 10 Famous Chefs Are Making Their Moms for Mother's Day Slideshow - Recipes

Mariana never expected to sell food for a living.

The mother of three, including a newborn, found herself caring for her children, her brother, who had suffered a stroke in 2018, and her mother, who was diagnosed with uterine cancer in 2019.

After the pandemic hit in March 2020, her mother decided to end chemotherapy treatments and return to their native state of Puebla, Mexico. Two months later, her mother passed away. Then, her husband, Horacio, was hospitalized with COVID-19.

”It seems like God has mistaken me for someone else,” she said, as if she has been receiving someone else’s punishment. That’s when Mariana decided to sell tamales and mole at home. She makes them with chicken or beef, every other week.

Parishioners from her church and other community members come knocking on her door for tamales. A Norristown restaurant sells her mole.

“I wasn’t expecting this kind of support,” she said. “It seems that I don’t cook that bad, right?”

Mariana said that she learned to cook the tamales and make mole with the abuelitas and older ladies that met during festivals and gatherings in Puebla when she was a child. The 37-year-old said cooking has become a space for her to find joy and to provide for her family.

In the kitchen, she said she loves the blend of colors of the japaleños, chiles, nopales, and tomatoes. She also likes the flavor of mole with arroz con pollo and enchiladas. Mariana sent her brother back to Puebla last week, where he can find open patios and more siblings to care for him. She said she feels useful as she works from home in times when her family needs her most.

“I know that every one of us will live difficult times in their lives,” she said. ”For good or for bad, this is mine and I just pray to God for strength to keep cooking through it.”

These moms brought family and culture together

The toughest years of motherhood for Zaza Briceño, 57, were when her three children had to flee Venezuela because of the humanitarian and economic crisis that has been affecting her home country for more than 20 years.

“I passed from living with my children to have them a video call away, and even sometimes the electrical and internet instability of the country did not even allow me to do that,” she said. “I had to teach them from the phone how to make the recipes I made them like my empanadas, my arepas and my calentadito [a mix of beef and rice], and now, I am teaching how to make them for my grandchildren.”

The country that once gave her endless opportunities could not offer the same to her children, who are among the 5.4 million Venezuelans who have left the country since 2015 according to the United Nations. “I eventually did not see a future for myself in my own country, and I also decided to move closer to my children and to have a better future,” said Briceño who now works in a mortgage company in Delaware and lives with her sister Margarita Swartz, 59.

Swartz moved with her family to Philadelphia in 1988 after she was carjacked in Caracas. Years later, she got divorced and was able to find a job where she could spend time at home and take care of her children. She became one of the best-known real estate agents for the Latino and Venezuelan community in Philadelphia, and that also has helped her share her roots with her children and stepchildren.

They would invite friends to their house to eat tequeños, arepas, pernil, among many other traditional specialties, and play Venezuelan music in their basement — where eventually Casa de Venezuela Philadelphia, a nonprofit that supports Venezuelan immigrants, was founded.

Briceño and Swartz were inspired by their late mother, Lía Medina de Briceño, who they say taught them everything they know. Her memory helps them to maintain their Venezuelan roots in their home away from home.

This single mom is an empowered business owner

After she divorced in the late 1990s, Sagrario Germán, relied on her cooking to provide for her family. Raising her two daughters as a single mother, she worked two restaurant shifts in northern Manhattan, one as a waitress overnight and the other as the evening cook at her mother’s comedor económico.

The native of the coastal town of Nagua, Dominican Republic, became a skilled cook while working with her mother — specializing in seafood dishes prepared with coconut milk or garlic sauce from her home province.

“Even though I never studied it [cooking], I’m extremely proud of what I’ve been able to do in the kitchen,” Germán, 46, said.

In 2008, Germán decided to move to Philadelphia with her family to open a restaurant of her own called Vivaldi in Fairhill. Since then, Germán has been providing customers with the traditional Dominican cuisine: mofongo, pernil, mero empanizado, arroz amarillo con pollo asado y habichuelas, tostones, mangú, and more. Her specialty is shrimp in garlic sauce.

Germán has run all parts of the restaurant, including its management and deliveries. Her daughters have graduated from college and she has been able to provide job opportunities for others in her family.

”It gives me so much peace of mind to think that I’ve been able to build this being the head of my household.”

Despite having to close her business last year due to the pandemic, Germán was able to return and slowly recover her clientele and workers. Now, she says can prepare for retirement.

”After we’ve worked so hard — me, my mother, and my entire family — I think it’s time to do things calmly.”


What 10 Famous Chefs Are Making Their Moms for Mother's Day Slideshow - Recipes

Mariana never expected to sell food for a living.

The mother of three, including a newborn, found herself caring for her children, her brother, who had suffered a stroke in 2018, and her mother, who was diagnosed with uterine cancer in 2019.

After the pandemic hit in March 2020, her mother decided to end chemotherapy treatments and return to their native state of Puebla, Mexico. Two months later, her mother passed away. Then, her husband, Horacio, was hospitalized with COVID-19.

”It seems like God has mistaken me for someone else,” she said, as if she has been receiving someone else’s punishment. That’s when Mariana decided to sell tamales and mole at home. She makes them with chicken or beef, every other week.

Parishioners from her church and other community members come knocking on her door for tamales. A Norristown restaurant sells her mole.

“I wasn’t expecting this kind of support,” she said. “It seems that I don’t cook that bad, right?”

Mariana said that she learned to cook the tamales and make mole with the abuelitas and older ladies that met during festivals and gatherings in Puebla when she was a child. The 37-year-old said cooking has become a space for her to find joy and to provide for her family.

In the kitchen, she said she loves the blend of colors of the japaleños, chiles, nopales, and tomatoes. She also likes the flavor of mole with arroz con pollo and enchiladas. Mariana sent her brother back to Puebla last week, where he can find open patios and more siblings to care for him. She said she feels useful as she works from home in times when her family needs her most.

“I know that every one of us will live difficult times in their lives,” she said. ”For good or for bad, this is mine and I just pray to God for strength to keep cooking through it.”

These moms brought family and culture together

The toughest years of motherhood for Zaza Briceño, 57, were when her three children had to flee Venezuela because of the humanitarian and economic crisis that has been affecting her home country for more than 20 years.

“I passed from living with my children to have them a video call away, and even sometimes the electrical and internet instability of the country did not even allow me to do that,” she said. “I had to teach them from the phone how to make the recipes I made them like my empanadas, my arepas and my calentadito [a mix of beef and rice], and now, I am teaching how to make them for my grandchildren.”

The country that once gave her endless opportunities could not offer the same to her children, who are among the 5.4 million Venezuelans who have left the country since 2015 according to the United Nations. “I eventually did not see a future for myself in my own country, and I also decided to move closer to my children and to have a better future,” said Briceño who now works in a mortgage company in Delaware and lives with her sister Margarita Swartz, 59.

Swartz moved with her family to Philadelphia in 1988 after she was carjacked in Caracas. Years later, she got divorced and was able to find a job where she could spend time at home and take care of her children. She became one of the best-known real estate agents for the Latino and Venezuelan community in Philadelphia, and that also has helped her share her roots with her children and stepchildren.

They would invite friends to their house to eat tequeños, arepas, pernil, among many other traditional specialties, and play Venezuelan music in their basement — where eventually Casa de Venezuela Philadelphia, a nonprofit that supports Venezuelan immigrants, was founded.

Briceño and Swartz were inspired by their late mother, Lía Medina de Briceño, who they say taught them everything they know. Her memory helps them to maintain their Venezuelan roots in their home away from home.

This single mom is an empowered business owner

After she divorced in the late 1990s, Sagrario Germán, relied on her cooking to provide for her family. Raising her two daughters as a single mother, she worked two restaurant shifts in northern Manhattan, one as a waitress overnight and the other as the evening cook at her mother’s comedor económico.

The native of the coastal town of Nagua, Dominican Republic, became a skilled cook while working with her mother — specializing in seafood dishes prepared with coconut milk or garlic sauce from her home province.

“Even though I never studied it [cooking], I’m extremely proud of what I’ve been able to do in the kitchen,” Germán, 46, said.

In 2008, Germán decided to move to Philadelphia with her family to open a restaurant of her own called Vivaldi in Fairhill. Since then, Germán has been providing customers with the traditional Dominican cuisine: mofongo, pernil, mero empanizado, arroz amarillo con pollo asado y habichuelas, tostones, mangú, and more. Her specialty is shrimp in garlic sauce.

Germán has run all parts of the restaurant, including its management and deliveries. Her daughters have graduated from college and she has been able to provide job opportunities for others in her family.

”It gives me so much peace of mind to think that I’ve been able to build this being the head of my household.”

Despite having to close her business last year due to the pandemic, Germán was able to return and slowly recover her clientele and workers. Now, she says can prepare for retirement.

”After we’ve worked so hard — me, my mother, and my entire family — I think it’s time to do things calmly.”