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Mexican Chocolate Brownies

Mexican Chocolate Brownies


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Ingredients

For the brownies

  • 1 family-size package fudge brownie mix
  • 1 Tablespoon vanilla extract
  • 1 Teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 Cup semisweet chocolate chips

For the frosting

  • 16 chocolate frosting
  • 1/4 Teaspoon ground cinnamon

Directions

For the brownies

Prepare the brownie mix as directed on the package. Stir in the chocolate chips, vanilla, and cinnamon. Spread in a greased 13-by-9-inch baking pan.

Bake and cool as directed on the package.

For the frosting

In a medium bowl, mix the chocolate frosting with the cinnamon. Spread over the cooled brownies and cut into squares.

Nutritional Facts

Servings24

Calories Per Serving1342

Folate equivalent (total)4µg1%



Add butter, sugars, and water to a large saucepan. Bring to a boil over medium-low heat, stirring constantly.
Remove from heat. Stir in part of the chocolate chips until melted and combined.
Let cool for 5 minutes.

Whisk in the eggs one at a time, whisking the entire time so you don’t get egg pieces in the brownies.
Whisk in the vanilla.

Add the flour, baking soda, cinnamon, cayenne pepper, and salt. Whisk in just until combined.
Stir in remaining chocolate chips.

Pour the batter into the prepared pan. Bake until a wooden toothpick inserted in the center comes out with a few fudgy crumbs. You don’t want the toothpick to be clean or the brownies will be overcooked.
Cool to room temperature in the pan on a wire cooling rack. Cut and serve.


Ingredients

In a large bowl set over a pan of barely simmering water, stir butter and unsweetened chocolate until melted and smooth. Remove from heat and whisk in brown sugar and granulated sugar. Add eggs one at a time, whisking well after each addition. Whisk in vanilla and almond extract. Stir in flour, cinnamon, baking powder, and salt until well blended.

Spread batter level in a buttered and floured 9- by 13-inch baking pan. Squeeze handfuls of Mexican chocolate streusel until it sticks together, then crumble into chunks evenly over surface of batter.

Bake brownies in a 325° oven until a wooden skewer inserted in the center comes out with moist crumbs attached, 30 to 35 minutes. Let cool in pan on a rack for at least 20 minutes, then cut into 24 or 32 squares (if making up to 1 day ahead, cool completely, then wrap uncut brownies airtight).

Mexican chocolate streusel. In a food processor or a bowl, whirl or stir 1/2 cup all-purpose flour and 1/4 cup firmly packed brown sugar until well blended. Add 5 tablespoons butter and whirl or rub in with your fingers until mixture forms coarse crumbs. Pulse in 4 1/2 ounces (about 1 1/2 tablets) coarsely chopped Mexican chocolate (some larger chunks will remain), or chop finely with a knife and stir into flour mixture. Use immediately or chill airtight for up to 1 week.


Recipe Summary

  • ¾ cup butter, cut into chunks
  • 9 ounces unsweetened chocolate, finely chopped (about 2 cups)
  • 1 ½ cups firmly packed brown sugar
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 5 large eggs
  • 1 ½ tablespoons vanilla
  • 1 ½ teaspoons almond extract
  • 1 ½ cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 ½ teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon baking powder
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • Mexican chocolate streusel

In a large bowl set over a pan of barely simmering water, stir butter and unsweetened chocolate until melted and smooth. Remove from heat and whisk in brown sugar and granulated sugar. Add eggs one at a time, whisking well after each addition. Whisk in vanilla and almond extract. Stir in flour, cinnamon, baking powder, and salt until well blended.

Spread batter level in a buttered and floured 9- by 13-inch baking pan. Squeeze handfuls of Mexican chocolate streusel until it sticks together, then crumble into chunks evenly over surface of batter.

Bake brownies in a 325° oven until a wooden skewer inserted in the center comes out with moist crumbs attached, 30 to 35 minutes. Let cool in pan on a rack for at least 20 minutes, then cut into 24 or 32 squares (if making up to 1 day ahead, cool completely, then wrap uncut brownies airtight).

Mexican chocolate streusel. In a food processor or a bowl, whirl or stir 1/2 cup all-purpose flour and 1/4 cup firmly packed brown sugar until well blended. Add 5 tablespoons butter and whirl or rub in with your fingers until mixture forms coarse crumbs. Pulse in 4 1/2 ounces (about 1 1/2 tablets) coarsely chopped Mexican chocolate (some larger chunks will remain), or chop finely with a knife and stir into flour mixture. Use immediately or chill airtight for up to 1 week.


Comments (3)

We love this recipe — so simple and easy, and just delicious. Works every time!

Delicious! I added agave syrup instead of the cane sugar but reduced the amount a bit. The brownies have a soft texture and we really liked the zing of the cayenne pepper. Will definitely make this again.

Hi Julia, do you think the apple sauce will make it sweet enough? I don’t eat any sugar, the applesauce will be OK, or do you think it will taste just like beans with chocolate maybe I’ll give it a try with half the dough.


Recipe Summary

  • 1 ½ cups unsalted butter
  • 3 cups white sugar
  • 6 eggs
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla extract
  • 1 ¼ cups unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1 ½ cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 ¾ teaspoons ground Mexican cinnamon (canela)
  • ½ teaspoon ground pequin chile pepper
  • ¾ teaspoon kosher salt
  • ¾ teaspoon baking powder

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Line a 12x15-inch baking pan with parchment paper, leaving about 3 inches of paper overhanging 2 sides to use as handles.

Place the butter in a microwave-safe bowl, and cook on Medium until the butter is about half melted, about 1 minute. Mash the butter with sugar until well combined, and stir in eggs one at a time, incorporating each one before adding the next. Mix in vanilla extract.

Sift the cocoa, flour, cinnamon, pequin pepper, salt, and baking powder into a bowl. Sprinkle in any salt caught in the sifter. Mix the flour mixture into the butter mixture, stirring to blend well, and pour the batter into the prepared baking pan.

Bake in the preheated oven until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out with moist crumbs, 20 to 25 minutes. Let cool in the pan, and use parchment paper handles to remove the brownies for slicing.


Mexican Chocolate Brownies


Mexican chocolate can refer to several types of chocolate, including a hot chocolate drink, but all of these chocolates have one thing in common: they’re spicy. Mexican chocolate, in just about every form, is flavored with a variety of spices. Cinnamon is always present and some variations use ground chilis to add some heat to the mix. I like these spicy chocolates (especially when served as a thick hot chocolate) and like to spice up my chocolate recipes from time to time using Mexican chocolate as inspiration.

These Mexican Chocolate Brownies are definitely on the spicy side. The fudgy, slightly chewy brownies are made with dark chocolate and get an extra deep flavor from the addition of some cocoa powder. They’re flavored with cinnamon, cayenne pepper and chili powder, as well as vanilla extract. The cinnamon, cayenne and chili all come together to give the brownies a nice balance of spice and heat that really compliments the chocolate.

I also like to mix in some chocolate chips or chunks of chopped chocolate with this recipe, as the plainer chocolate helps to balance out the spices. The brownies are really complex, but not overwhelmingly hot or spicy. They taste better the day after they’re made, as the spices have time to meld together in that time. If stored for a few days (in an airtight container), the cayenne will actually become stronger and your brownies will be a bit spicier.

These are delicious as-is and I would only recommend cutting back on the cayenne if you are very sensitive to spicy foods, as a smaller amount will not be that noticeable against all that chocolate. If they get a little too spicy, warm them up and serve them with a side of cooling vanilla ice cream.

Mexican Chocolate Brownies
1/2 cup butter
2-oz bittersweet or dark chocolate, chopped
2 tbsp cocoa powder
1 cup sugar
2 large eggs
1 tsp vanilla extract
2/3 cup flour
1 tsp ground cinnamon
1/3 tsp ground cayenne pepper
1/4 tsp chili powder
1/4 tsp salt
2/3 cup chocolate chips (pref. semisweet or bittersweet)

Preheat oven to 350F. Line an 8×8 or 9×9-inch square baking pan with aluminum foil and lightly grease.
In a small, heatproof bowl, melt butter and chocolate together. Stir with a fork until very smooth. Stir in cocoa powder until fully incorporated. Set aside to cool slightly.
In a large bowl, whisk together sugar, eggs and vanilla extract. Whisking steadily, pour chocolate mixture into sugar mixture. Stir until smooth. Sift flour, ground cinnamon, cayenne pepper, chili powder and salt into the bowl and stir until just combined. Fold in chocolate chips.
Pour into prepared pan and spread into an even layer.
Bake for about 35 minutes, until brownies set and a toothpick inserted into the middle of the pan comes out with only a few moist crumbs, not batter, attached.
Cool in the pan completely before slicing.


Flourless Mexican Brownies

My flourless Mexican brownies are thick, rich, and flavored with real Mexican vanilla, Ceylon cinnamon, and a subtle hint of spiciness.

This post is part of a social shopper marketing insight campaign with Pollinate Media Group® and The J.M. Smucker Company, but all my opinions are my own. #pmedia #DunkinDonutsPublix http://my-disclosur.es/OBsstV

Brownies mean a lot to me.

When I first began this food blog, I titled it “The Perfect Brownie,” in honor of my search for the perfect brownie recipe. I must have tried dozens of brownie recipes back in those days!

Even after my cooking skills improved enough to branch out to all kinds of recipes, I still come back to baking brownies. It’s like chocolate-flavored meditation.

I start out by brainstorming. For me, brainstorming works best with a cup of coffee. All those happy flavors get my mind into gear. Previous to this brainstorming session, I picked up a bag of Dunkin’ Donuts® coffee at my local Publix.

I like to buy whole bean coffee so that I can grind it to my liking at home, but Dunkin’ Donuts coffee also comes pre-ground and in K-Cups if you prefer it that way.

The classic “Original” flavor is my favorite. You can also find Dunkin’ Donuts coffee in different roasts (everything from Decaf to Dark), wild flavors (like Blueberry Muffin or Vanilla Cupcake), and even seasonal flavors like Coconut or S’mores!

Once I have my cup of coffee, I sit down with my little yellow notepad. Yes, a real paper notepad!

I’m a big believer in jotting things down by hand.

First, I take a few quick notes on my recipe goals. This might include flavors or methods that I want to use.

If I need guidance, I’ll have another sip of coffee and do a little research on my laptop. Since I wanted to incorporate the ancient flavors of Mexican chocolate into a brownie recipe, I needed to get accurate information.

I found out that the ancient Aztecs (who lived in what is now called Mexico) had many different recipes for chocolate. These chocolate recipes included an assortment of medicinal herbs and spices that you might not necessarily associate with chocolate.

I managed to narrow down my potential ingredient list to some of the most common additions:

  • A spice that is a relative of the black pepper plant
  • A particular type of cinnamon
  • Flavoring from the vanilla bean pod
  • A type of red pepper

These days, Mexican chocolate is also sweetened with cane sugar or brown sugar.

With one last, delicious sip of Dunkin’ Donuts coffee, I decided to cherry pick the best of the old and the new by combining real Mexican vanilla, canela (Ceylon cinnamon), brown sugar, and a tiny hint of of red pepper to create these Mexican brownies.

Fueled by coffee, it was a snap to throw together these Mexican brownies. By the time they had cooled, I was even ready for a second cup. Blissed out by the baking process and invigorated by the coffee, it was lovely to just relax and enjoy these rich brownies with powerful cocoa kick and a touch of spice.

Now that you have my flourless Mexican brownies recipe, you can take advantage of $1.00 off any ONE (1) Dunkin’ Donuts varieties now through 5/6/17 at your local Publix, while supplies last. Get your own coffee and pair it with these brownies for a real treat!


Are Mexican Brownies Spicy?

Mexican brownies can be spicy, but that spice factor is something you can easily control with your choice of seasonings.

This particular recipe does have a bit of heat from the cayenne powder, though it isn&rsquot heat that jumps out at you. It is much more of a blooming heat that warms the mouth and tongue the longer you eat them.

You can easily omit the cayenne powder for milder heat, or add in extra or spicier chili powder, such as ghost pepper powder, for hotter brownies.

The real key here, though, in my opinion, is the ancho powder. Ancho powder is ground dried poblano peppers, and they offer an earthy, almost chocolaty, rich flavor, which is a perfect pairing with chocolate.

Don&rsquot worry, these Mexican brownies don&rsquot taste like chili. The chili powders completely enhance the flavor of the chocolate.

Just beware. They are very addictive.


Mexican Brownies


The Chocolate Fetish. A locally owned business that makes utterly amazing chocolate truffles. We discovered The Chocolate Fetish shortly after moving to Asheville, and have since made plenty of excuses to stroll by its quaint downtown storefront.

My personal favorite truffle is the the Ancient Pleasures Truffle, a sexy fusion of dark chocolate and cayenne pepper.

This combination originated in Mexico long ago, and is still evident in many latin dishes like mole’. It is also thought to be an aphrodisiac. *wink*

The Ancient Pleasure Truffles inspired me to incorporate cayenne pepper into my favorite brownie recipe. The spicy heat plays so well with the deep smoky essence of chocolate. I then added instant coffee granules and cinnamon to round out these brownies, to have the flavor of authentic Mexican chocolate disks. Hence the name Mexican Brownies.

Let’s talk about brownie textures for a moment. Generally speaking, there are two types of brownie recipes. Those that use cocoa powder as the chocolate base, and those that use melted chocolate.

The use of cocoa generates a “cake-ier” brownie, while the melted chocolate version produces a dense “fudgier” brownie.

Personally, I like fudgy brownies… I usually only make cocoa style brownies when I’m using the brownies as a layer in dessert bars.

These fudgy Mexican Brownies are much more decadent than cocoa brownies. Yet the addition of spice balances the rich fudge flavor and texture marvelously!

If you are planning to stay in and cook for a special loved one this Valentine’s Day, these spicy little Mexican Brownies are a good way to finish your meal and create some sparks!


Watch the video: Φλαούνες - Κυπριακό Παραδοσιακό Πασχαλινό Έδεσμα. Τρελές Κουτάλες (June 2022).


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